Printing for Prestige? Publishing and Publications by Ming Princes Part 2

Printing for Prestige? Publishing and Publications by Ming Princes Part 2 © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/221062811X594342 East Asian Publishing and Society 1 (2011) 105-144 brill.nl/eaps EAST ASIAN PUBLISHING AND SOCIETY Printing for Prestige? Publishing and Publications by Ming Princes Part 2 Jérôme Kerlouégan École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France jkerlouegan@yahoo.com Abstract Scattered thro ughout the realm in a great number of provincial courts, Ming imperial clansmen did not wield political or military power. Some among them therefore used their energies to pub- lish books; indeed, the publishing activities of the Ming princes constitute one of many elements of what can be termed “princely culture.” Even though princely imprints formed an insignificant proportion of Ming publications, a large number of them have survived to our day. Based on the examination of approximately 240 such editions, this essay explores the relationships between the princes and the literati who assisted them. It raises questions central to princely publishing: How learned were the princes? What books did they publish? For which audiences and with what objectives? What are the main characteristics of princely publications? Did princes have well-defined publishing strategies? The last section of the essay addresses the heritage of Ming princely publications in the Qing dynasty. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png East Asian Publishing and Society Brill

Printing for Prestige? Publishing and Publications by Ming Princes Part 2

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2210-6278
eISSN
2210-6286
D.O.I.
10.1163/221062811X594342
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/221062811X594342 East Asian Publishing and Society 1 (2011) 105-144 brill.nl/eaps EAST ASIAN PUBLISHING AND SOCIETY Printing for Prestige? Publishing and Publications by Ming Princes Part 2 Jérôme Kerlouégan École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris, France jkerlouegan@yahoo.com Abstract Scattered thro ughout the realm in a great number of provincial courts, Ming imperial clansmen did not wield political or military power. Some among them therefore used their energies to pub- lish books; indeed, the publishing activities of the Ming princes constitute one of many elements of what can be termed “princely culture.” Even though princely imprints formed an insignificant proportion of Ming publications, a large number of them have survived to our day. Based on the examination of approximately 240 such editions, this essay explores the relationships between the princes and the literati who assisted them. It raises questions central to princely publishing: How learned were the princes? What books did they publish? For which audiences and with what objectives? What are the main characteristics of princely publications? Did princes have well-defined publishing strategies? The last section of the essay addresses the heritage of Ming princely publications in the Qing dynasty.

Journal

East Asian Publishing and SocietyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: book collections; Ming princely publishing; Ming imperial clan; rare books; Ming publishing

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