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Prehistoric Marine Fishing Adaptation in Southern Taiwan

Prehistoric Marine Fishing Adaptation in Southern Taiwan © Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 PREHISTORIC MARINE FISHING ADAPTATION IN SOUTHERN TAIWAN BY LI KUANG-TI 李匡悌 (Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica) Abstract This paper discusses prehistoric fishing activities as seen through archaeological remains from the area of Eluanbi in southern Taiwan. The excavations of the coastal site of Eluanbi II in 1993 documented a continuous sequence of occupations beginning with an initial settlement around 4000 BP and continuing until 2500 BP. Analyses of the fish bone assemblages and fishing implements, as well as studies of the marine envi- ronment, provide new data for studying prehistoric fishing strategies. Fish provided the most abundant potential food resource in this area. Fifteen families of marine fish contributed to the ancient Eluanbi diet, and the most common taxa found in the fish assemblage were sail-fish, shark, mullet, and dolphinfish. In terms of assemblage com- position, abundance, and density, a significant temporal pattern is shown with a gradual increase of remains from the initial occupation period onward, peaking in Stage 3, and thereafter declining in the late occupation. Fishing gear remains suggest that prehistoric Eluanbi II settlers developed very effective fishing strategies. Through time, increased remains of offshore fish http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of East Asian Archaeology Brill

Prehistoric Marine Fishing Adaptation in Southern Taiwan

Journal of East Asian Archaeology , Volume 3 (1): 47 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1387-6813
eISSN
1568-5233
DOI
10.1163/156852301100402769
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Brill, Leiden 2002 JEAA 3, 1–2 PREHISTORIC MARINE FISHING ADAPTATION IN SOUTHERN TAIWAN BY LI KUANG-TI 李匡悌 (Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica) Abstract This paper discusses prehistoric fishing activities as seen through archaeological remains from the area of Eluanbi in southern Taiwan. The excavations of the coastal site of Eluanbi II in 1993 documented a continuous sequence of occupations beginning with an initial settlement around 4000 BP and continuing until 2500 BP. Analyses of the fish bone assemblages and fishing implements, as well as studies of the marine envi- ronment, provide new data for studying prehistoric fishing strategies. Fish provided the most abundant potential food resource in this area. Fifteen families of marine fish contributed to the ancient Eluanbi diet, and the most common taxa found in the fish assemblage were sail-fish, shark, mullet, and dolphinfish. In terms of assemblage com- position, abundance, and density, a significant temporal pattern is shown with a gradual increase of remains from the initial occupation period onward, peaking in Stage 3, and thereafter declining in the late occupation. Fishing gear remains suggest that prehistoric Eluanbi II settlers developed very effective fishing strategies. Through time, increased remains of offshore fish

Journal

Journal of East Asian ArchaeologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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