Predictions From the Ranging Hypothesis for the Evolution of Long Distance Signals in Birds

Predictions From the Ranging Hypothesis for the Evolution of Long Distance Signals in Birds PREDICTIONS FROM THE RANGING HYPOTHESIS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF LONG DISTANCE SIGNALS IN BIRDS by EUGENE S. MORTON1) (Department of Zoological Research, Smithsonian Institution, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C. 20008, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 1-II-1986) The ranging hypothesis (RH) (MORTON, 1982) proposes the means by which birds assess their distances from one another using sound signals, in situations when hearing is the most important source of this informa- tion. This would seem basic to our understanding and study of the diverse ways in which birds use long distance signals. The proximate mechanism predicted by the RH has now been identified in several studies (RICHARDS, 1981; MCGREGOR el al., 1983; MCGREGOR & KREBS, 1984; SORJONEN, 1983; MCGREGOR & FALLS, 1984; MORTON et al., 1986; SHY & MORTON, in press). The assessment of distance using degradation in signals is now known to be based upon whether or not the listener has the perceived signal in its memory. General features of degradation (e.g., reverberations, differential frequency attenuation, etc. ) do not account for the field data reported. The bird must have the signal in its memory before it is able to assess degradation and make responses appropriate to the apparent http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Predictions From the Ranging Hypothesis for the Evolution of Long Distance Signals in Birds

Behaviour, Volume 99 (1-2): 65 – Jan 1, 1986

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1986 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853986X00414
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PREDICTIONS FROM THE RANGING HYPOTHESIS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF LONG DISTANCE SIGNALS IN BIRDS by EUGENE S. MORTON1) (Department of Zoological Research, Smithsonian Institution, National Zoological Park, Washington, D.C. 20008, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 1-II-1986) The ranging hypothesis (RH) (MORTON, 1982) proposes the means by which birds assess their distances from one another using sound signals, in situations when hearing is the most important source of this informa- tion. This would seem basic to our understanding and study of the diverse ways in which birds use long distance signals. The proximate mechanism predicted by the RH has now been identified in several studies (RICHARDS, 1981; MCGREGOR el al., 1983; MCGREGOR & KREBS, 1984; SORJONEN, 1983; MCGREGOR & FALLS, 1984; MORTON et al., 1986; SHY & MORTON, in press). The assessment of distance using degradation in signals is now known to be based upon whether or not the listener has the perceived signal in its memory. General features of degradation (e.g., reverberations, differential frequency attenuation, etc. ) do not account for the field data reported. The bird must have the signal in its memory before it is able to assess degradation and make responses appropriate to the apparent

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1986

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