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Pragmatism, Race, and Inclusiveness

Pragmatism, Race, and Inclusiveness Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 2004), 103-118 Editions Rodopi © 2004 Lucius Outlaw's On Race and Philosophy has traced the racist history of Western philosophy, and locates pragmatism in the tradition of Western thought, which, he argues, has little to say about issues important to African Americans. I argue that, when it comes to pragmatism, Outlaw is mistaken. Pragmatism embraces a spirit of inclusiveness that is captured by no other philosophical tradition. Outlaw's views on race and philosophy are entirely consistent with the inclusive spirit of pragmatism. We often frame answers to philosophical questions as being from a Peircean perspective or perhaps more controversially, from a pragmatist perspective, but can we coherently speak of an American perspective? Furthermore, is it fair to say that there have been and continue to be voices from underrepresented groups in academic philosophy that go unheard due to their race or national origin? In this regard, I will investigate the views of Richard Rorty and Lucius Outlaw who provide unique ways of looking at the views that have come to be known as American philosophy. Outlaw argues that academic philosophy has systematically excluded the voices and issues of African American thinkers http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Pragmatism, Race, and Inclusiveness

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 1 (1): 103 – Apr 21, 2004

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2004 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 2004), 103-118 Editions Rodopi © 2004 Lucius Outlaw's On Race and Philosophy has traced the racist history of Western philosophy, and locates pragmatism in the tradition of Western thought, which, he argues, has little to say about issues important to African Americans. I argue that, when it comes to pragmatism, Outlaw is mistaken. Pragmatism embraces a spirit of inclusiveness that is captured by no other philosophical tradition. Outlaw's views on race and philosophy are entirely consistent with the inclusive spirit of pragmatism. We often frame answers to philosophical questions as being from a Peircean perspective or perhaps more controversially, from a pragmatist perspective, but can we coherently speak of an American perspective? Furthermore, is it fair to say that there have been and continue to be voices from underrepresented groups in academic philosophy that go unheard due to their race or national origin? In this regard, I will investigate the views of Richard Rorty and Lucius Outlaw who provide unique ways of looking at the views that have come to be known as American philosophy. Outlaw argues that academic philosophy has systematically excluded the voices and issues of African American thinkers

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2004

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