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Practical Philosophy as a Model of the Human Sciences

Practical Philosophy as a Model of the Human Sciences Practical Philosophy as a Model of the Human Sciences HANS-GEORG GADAMER University of Heidelberg The title of my talk today could serve as a heading for this whole con- ference. It is evident that the expression "human sciences" is prob- lematic for us today and that we must come to the conclusion that science should be defined by us in another way than it is for modern times. This, of course, includes a certain justification of the older Greek conception of knowledge as "philosophy." It is not because of my special predilection for the Greeks that I propose this topic for today, but rather because of the necessity of seeking an epistemological self- understanding which is not based on the credence of the natural sciences and of the ideal of method as it was characteristically called at the beginning of the seventeenth century and as it dominates the research work and our academic activities in the humanities. It is for this reason alone that I want to go back to the philosophy of Aristotle, for it is this ancient philosopher who defended for the first time a special approach to the subjects of human action and human institutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Practical Philosophy as a Model of the Human Sciences

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 9 (1): 74 – Jan 1, 1979

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1979 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916479X00057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Practical Philosophy as a Model of the Human Sciences HANS-GEORG GADAMER University of Heidelberg The title of my talk today could serve as a heading for this whole con- ference. It is evident that the expression "human sciences" is prob- lematic for us today and that we must come to the conclusion that science should be defined by us in another way than it is for modern times. This, of course, includes a certain justification of the older Greek conception of knowledge as "philosophy." It is not because of my special predilection for the Greeks that I propose this topic for today, but rather because of the necessity of seeking an epistemological self- understanding which is not based on the credence of the natural sciences and of the ideal of method as it was characteristically called at the beginning of the seventeenth century and as it dominates the research work and our academic activities in the humanities. It is for this reason alone that I want to go back to the philosophy of Aristotle, for it is this ancient philosopher who defended for the first time a special approach to the subjects of human action and human institutions.

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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