Potential Benefits of Canine Companionship for Military Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Potential Benefits of Canine Companionship for Military Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress... Abstract Investigators surveyed 30 U.S. military veterans with PTSD who reported having benefited from living with a dog. The subject population included men and women aged 34 to 67, with a mean of 56.9 years ( SD = 8.1), who were being treated at two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics. Participants received a questionnaire packet designed to assess aspects of their mental and physical health and relationship with a canine companion, which they completed at home and returned either in person or by mail. The packet consisted of the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M); Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II); Veterans Short Form Health Survey and Health Behaviors Questionnaire (SF-36); Dog Information Sheet; Dog Relationship Questionnaire; and Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale. Respondents indicated that since adopting their dog they had experienced improvement in several areas, including feeling calmer, less lonely, less depressed, and less worried about their and their family’s safety. These results suggest that living with a companion dog may help relieve some of the psychological distress associated with PTSD in some veterans. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Society & Animals Brill

Potential Benefits of Canine Companionship for Military Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1063-1119
eISSN
1568-5306
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685306-12341286
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Investigators surveyed 30 U.S. military veterans with PTSD who reported having benefited from living with a dog. The subject population included men and women aged 34 to 67, with a mean of 56.9 years ( SD = 8.1), who were being treated at two Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient clinics. Participants received a questionnaire packet designed to assess aspects of their mental and physical health and relationship with a canine companion, which they completed at home and returned either in person or by mail. The packet consisted of the PTSD Checklist-Military Version (PCL-M); Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II); Veterans Short Form Health Survey and Health Behaviors Questionnaire (SF-36); Dog Information Sheet; Dog Relationship Questionnaire; and Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale. Respondents indicated that since adopting their dog they had experienced improvement in several areas, including feeling calmer, less lonely, less depressed, and less worried about their and their family’s safety. These results suggest that living with a companion dog may help relieve some of the psychological distress associated with PTSD in some veterans.

Journal

Society & AnimalsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2013

Keywords: anxiety; canine companionship; nonhuman animal; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); veteran

References

  • The human-companion animal bond: How humans benefit
    Friedmann E. Son H.
  • Pet ownership, social support, and one-year survival after acute myocardial infarction in the Cardiac Arrhythmia Suppression
    Friedmann E. Thomas S. A.

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