Postures of the Military Dragon (Ctenophorus isolepis) in Relation to Substrate Temperature

Postures of the Military Dragon (Ctenophorus isolepis) in Relation to Substrate Temperature 419 Postures of the Military Dragon (Ctenophorus isolepis) in Relation to Substrate Temperature Jonathan B. Losos Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. The ability of lizards to behaviorally thermoregulate by changing position or posture has been recognized since the pioneering work of Cowles and Bogert (1944). Many subsequent workers have inferred that lizards make postural adjustments to alter heat flux (e.g., Fitch, 1956; Heath, 1965; Bartholomew, 1966; Mayhew, 1968; Heatwole, 1970; Brattstrom, 1971; DeWitt, 1971; Louw and Holm, 1972), but in only a few cases has the relationship between temperature and posture been quantified (e.g., Bradshaw and Main, 1968; Muth, 1977). Bradshaw and Main (1968) found little difference in the thermoregulatory behavior of four Australian agamids in the genera Pogona and Ctenophorus (generic assignations following Storr et al., 1983) despite marked dif- ferences in size and ecology. Here I report on thermal correlates of postural changes in a closely related species, the military dragon, Ctenophorus isolepis. Observations were made on 266 C. isolepis encountered in the desert in the township of Yulara, Northern Territory, Australia (25°S, 126°E) during 24 Sept-5 Oct and 1-7 Nov 1985. Lizards were spotted and flushed as I walked http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Amphibia-Reptilia Brill

Postures of the Military Dragon (Ctenophorus isolepis) in Relation to Substrate Temperature

Amphibia-Reptilia, Volume 8 (4): 419 – Jan 1, 1987

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1987 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0173-5373
eISSN
1568-5381
DOI
10.1163/156853887X00199
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

419 Postures of the Military Dragon (Ctenophorus isolepis) in Relation to Substrate Temperature Jonathan B. Losos Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. The ability of lizards to behaviorally thermoregulate by changing position or posture has been recognized since the pioneering work of Cowles and Bogert (1944). Many subsequent workers have inferred that lizards make postural adjustments to alter heat flux (e.g., Fitch, 1956; Heath, 1965; Bartholomew, 1966; Mayhew, 1968; Heatwole, 1970; Brattstrom, 1971; DeWitt, 1971; Louw and Holm, 1972), but in only a few cases has the relationship between temperature and posture been quantified (e.g., Bradshaw and Main, 1968; Muth, 1977). Bradshaw and Main (1968) found little difference in the thermoregulatory behavior of four Australian agamids in the genera Pogona and Ctenophorus (generic assignations following Storr et al., 1983) despite marked dif- ferences in size and ecology. Here I report on thermal correlates of postural changes in a closely related species, the military dragon, Ctenophorus isolepis. Observations were made on 266 C. isolepis encountered in the desert in the township of Yulara, Northern Territory, Australia (25°S, 126°E) during 24 Sept-5 Oct and 1-7 Nov 1985. Lizards were spotted and flushed as I walked

Journal

Amphibia-ReptiliaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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