POSTFOUNDATIONALISM AND SOCIAL DEMOCRACY

POSTFOUNDATIONALISM AND SOCIAL DEMOCRACY Danish Yearbook of Philosophy, Vol. 35 (2000), 7-26 MARKBEVIR University of California, Berkeley Postfoundationalism is often associated with the aesthetic dandyism of the postmodernists. Yet the absence of any given truths actually implies the individual is dependent on the community. This essay shows how postfoundationalism might lend support to an open form of social democracy. The absence of any given truths implies that an individual can come to hold beliefs and perform actions only against the background of the community, and this thick view of the self can support an ethic of fellowship centred on a concern with the welfare and empowerment of others. Once we recognise the social democratic nature of postfoundationalism, we might rewrite the postmodern emphasis on difference as a re­ minder that the community is not based on a fixed identity. The aesthetic dandyism of post­ of the claims of community, modernism could be reoriented to provide not a repudiation but rather a call for an open community. Is postfoundationalism necessarily tied to the aesthetic dandyism so often espoused by postmodemists? I will argue at the very least that postfounda­ tionalism is compatible with a progressive and open social democratic ethic, and more tentatively that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Danish Yearbook of Philosophy Brill

POSTFOUNDATIONALISM AND SOCIAL DEMOCRACY

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0070-2749
eISSN
2468-9300
D.O.I.
10.1163/24689300_0350102
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Danish Yearbook of Philosophy, Vol. 35 (2000), 7-26 MARKBEVIR University of California, Berkeley Postfoundationalism is often associated with the aesthetic dandyism of the postmodernists. Yet the absence of any given truths actually implies the individual is dependent on the community. This essay shows how postfoundationalism might lend support to an open form of social democracy. The absence of any given truths implies that an individual can come to hold beliefs and perform actions only against the background of the community, and this thick view of the self can support an ethic of fellowship centred on a concern with the welfare and empowerment of others. Once we recognise the social democratic nature of postfoundationalism, we might rewrite the postmodern emphasis on difference as a re­ minder that the community is not based on a fixed identity. The aesthetic dandyism of post­ of the claims of community, modernism could be reoriented to provide not a repudiation but rather a call for an open community. Is postfoundationalism necessarily tied to the aesthetic dandyism so often espoused by postmodemists? I will argue at the very least that postfounda­ tionalism is compatible with a progressive and open social democratic ethic, and more tentatively that

Journal

Danish Yearbook of PhilosophyBrill

Published: Aug 2, 2000

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