Policy Transfer in Oceans Governance: Learning Lessons from Australia's Oceans Policy Process

Policy Transfer in Oceans Governance: Learning Lessons from... INTRODUCTION This article examines policy transfer as an important mechanism for policy change in oceans governance. Since it entered into force in 1994, the Law of the Sea Convention (LOSC) has obligated signatories to demonstrate that they can effectively manage the resources within their Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). This article focuses primarily on the Australian response to fulfill its obligation to the LOSC through the development of Australia's Oceans Policy (AOP), and the transfer of key policy components to Canadian and New Zealand ocean initiatives. This article argues that government officials (or civil servants/bureaucrats) were essential agents of change who formed networks that contributed to successful policy transfer in oceans management. The study of oceans governance is multidisciplinary, yet it is often viewed from a narrower environmental, legal or scientific perspective. Political scientists have paid little attention to oceans governance despite it being a policy focus for many nations. Over the past decade, numerous coastal States have begun developing and implementing "oceans policies," often utilizing similar approaches, aims and institutional processes. While these oceans policies have resulted in policy change in oceans resource management, there has been little focus on how this change has come about. Policy transfer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ocean Yearbook Online Brill

Policy Transfer in Oceans Governance: Learning Lessons from Australia's Oceans Policy Process

Ocean Yearbook Online, Volume 22 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 1

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/policy-transfer-in-oceans-governance-learning-lessons-from-australia-s-vVgM69U1eo
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6001
DOI
10.1163/221160008X00082
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION This article examines policy transfer as an important mechanism for policy change in oceans governance. Since it entered into force in 1994, the Law of the Sea Convention (LOSC) has obligated signatories to demonstrate that they can effectively manage the resources within their Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs). This article focuses primarily on the Australian response to fulfill its obligation to the LOSC through the development of Australia's Oceans Policy (AOP), and the transfer of key policy components to Canadian and New Zealand ocean initiatives. This article argues that government officials (or civil servants/bureaucrats) were essential agents of change who formed networks that contributed to successful policy transfer in oceans management. The study of oceans governance is multidisciplinary, yet it is often viewed from a narrower environmental, legal or scientific perspective. Political scientists have paid little attention to oceans governance despite it being a policy focus for many nations. Over the past decade, numerous coastal States have begun developing and implementing "oceans policies," often utilizing similar approaches, aims and institutional processes. While these oceans policies have resulted in policy change in oceans resource management, there has been little focus on how this change has come about. Policy transfer

Journal

Ocean Yearbook OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off