Plato's Apology: Republic I

Plato's Apology: Republic I 29 Plato's Apology: Republic I ALEXANDER SESONSKE " T is at this point, I believe, that Plato's thought takes a different I direction from the philosophy of his master, Socrates. There are two ways in which a man may approach the task of conceiving an ideal society. One is to start with the moral reformation of the individual, and then to imagine a society consisting of perfect individuals. This is the logical outcome of Socrates' mission to his fellow-citizens as described in the Apology. The other is to take individual human nature as we find it, and to construct a social order that will make the best of it as it is and as it seems likely to remain. This is the course taken by Plato in the Republic. " 1 Thus F. M. Cornford, in his essay "Plato's Commonwealth," identifies the juncture at which Plato's method diverges from that of Socrates. It is not, of course, a minor divergence. From its source in the freedom exercised and cherished by Socrates who, feeling that "each person must organize his own independent search for the good, " 2 would discuss any question with any man who would ask and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Phronesis Brill

Plato's Apology: Republic I

Phronesis , Volume 6 (1-2): 29 – Jan 1, 1961

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1961 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0031-8868
eISSN
1568-5284
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852861X00035
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

29 Plato's Apology: Republic I ALEXANDER SESONSKE " T is at this point, I believe, that Plato's thought takes a different I direction from the philosophy of his master, Socrates. There are two ways in which a man may approach the task of conceiving an ideal society. One is to start with the moral reformation of the individual, and then to imagine a society consisting of perfect individuals. This is the logical outcome of Socrates' mission to his fellow-citizens as described in the Apology. The other is to take individual human nature as we find it, and to construct a social order that will make the best of it as it is and as it seems likely to remain. This is the course taken by Plato in the Republic. " 1 Thus F. M. Cornford, in his essay "Plato's Commonwealth," identifies the juncture at which Plato's method diverges from that of Socrates. It is not, of course, a minor divergence. From its source in the freedom exercised and cherished by Socrates who, feeling that "each person must organize his own independent search for the good, " 2 would discuss any question with any man who would ask and

Journal

PhronesisBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1961

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