Plasticity, and Its Limits, in Adult Human Primary Visual Cortex

Plasticity, and Its Limits, in Adult Human Primary Visual Cortex There is an ongoing debate about whether adult human primary visual cortex (V1) is capable of large-scale cortical reorganization in response to bilateral retinal lesions. Animal models suggest that the visual neural circuitry maintains some plasticity through adulthood, and there are also a few human imaging studies in support this notion. However, the interpretation of these data has been brought into question, because there are factors besides cortical reorganization, such as the presence of sampling bias and/or the unmasking of task-dependent feedback signals from higher level visual areas, that could also explain the results. How reasonable would it be to accept that adult human V1 does not reorganize itself in the face of disease? Here, we discuss new evidence for the hypothesis that adult human V1 is not as capable of reorganization as in animals and juveniles, because in adult humans, cortical reorganization would come with costs that outweigh its benefits. These costs are likely functional and visible in recent experiments on adaptation — a rapid, short-term form of neural plasticity — where they prevent reorganization from being sustained over the long term. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013) Brill

Plasticity, and Its Limits, in Adult Human Primary Visual Cortex

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/plasticity-and-its-limits-in-adult-human-primary-visual-cortex-902a4tl1KG
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright 2015 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Subject
Articles
ISSN
2213-4794
eISSN
2213-4808
D.O.I.
10.1163/22134808-00002496
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is an ongoing debate about whether adult human primary visual cortex (V1) is capable of large-scale cortical reorganization in response to bilateral retinal lesions. Animal models suggest that the visual neural circuitry maintains some plasticity through adulthood, and there are also a few human imaging studies in support this notion. However, the interpretation of these data has been brought into question, because there are factors besides cortical reorganization, such as the presence of sampling bias and/or the unmasking of task-dependent feedback signals from higher level visual areas, that could also explain the results. How reasonable would it be to accept that adult human V1 does not reorganize itself in the face of disease? Here, we discuss new evidence for the hypothesis that adult human V1 is not as capable of reorganization as in animals and juveniles, because in adult humans, cortical reorganization would come with costs that outweigh its benefits. These costs are likely functional and visible in recent experiments on adaptation — a rapid, short-term form of neural plasticity — where they prevent reorganization from being sustained over the long term.

Journal

Multisensory Research (continuation of Seeing & Perceiving from 2013)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2015

Keywords: Neuroplasticity; primary visual cortex; human adults; costs

References

  • Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration
    Baker C. I. Peli E. Knouf N. Kanwisher N. G.
  • Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: replication and clues about the role of foveal loss
    Baker C. I. Dilks D. D. Peli E. Kanwisher N.
  • Neuroscience: through the eyes of a mouse
    Baker M.
  • Plasticity in adult cat visual cortex (area 17) following circumscribed monocular lesions of all retinal layers
    Calford M. B. Wang C. Taglianetti V. Waleszczyk W. J. Burke W. Dreher B.
  • Visual adaptation: neural, psychological and computational aspects
    Clifford C. W. Webster M. A. Stanley G. B. Stocker A. A. Kohn A. Sharpee T. O. Schwartz O.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off