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Phenomenology as Humanism: The Case of Husserl and Sartre

Phenomenology as Humanism: The Case of Husserl and Sartre Phenomenology as Humanism: The Case of Husserl and Sartre THOMAS W. BUSCH Villanova University Ian Alexander, in his article, "The Phenomenological Philosophy in France."' likens the impact of Husserl on French thought to that of Wit- tgenstein on British thought: "the result in both cases has been to revolutionize the philosophical perspective." When he goes on to assess individual philosophers his judgment is that "of French phenomenologists Marcel and Merleau-Ponty come closest to its essen- tial aim." This type of judgment that the fruition of phenomenology is an existential philosophy deriving from Husserl's treatment, in his last work, of the grounding of consciousness in the pre-theoretical life-world is commonplace. Sartre once made an interesting comment on his rela- tionship to Merleau-Ponty in regard to phenomenology: "Alone, each of us was too easily persuaded of having understood the idea of phenomenology. Together, we were for each other the incarnation of its ambiguity. "2 This ambiguity springs on the one hand from phenomenology's emphasis on lived-experience, the life-world and description, and on the other from its emphasis on the reduction, reflec- tion and constitution. From the former emphasis there have developed philosophies (Merleau-Ponty's and Marcel's-although Marcel's work did not derive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Phenomenology as Humanism: The Case of Husserl and Sartre

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 9 (1): 127 – Jan 1, 1979

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1979 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916479X00084
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Phenomenology as Humanism: The Case of Husserl and Sartre THOMAS W. BUSCH Villanova University Ian Alexander, in his article, "The Phenomenological Philosophy in France."' likens the impact of Husserl on French thought to that of Wit- tgenstein on British thought: "the result in both cases has been to revolutionize the philosophical perspective." When he goes on to assess individual philosophers his judgment is that "of French phenomenologists Marcel and Merleau-Ponty come closest to its essen- tial aim." This type of judgment that the fruition of phenomenology is an existential philosophy deriving from Husserl's treatment, in his last work, of the grounding of consciousness in the pre-theoretical life-world is commonplace. Sartre once made an interesting comment on his rela- tionship to Merleau-Ponty in regard to phenomenology: "Alone, each of us was too easily persuaded of having understood the idea of phenomenology. Together, we were for each other the incarnation of its ambiguity. "2 This ambiguity springs on the one hand from phenomenology's emphasis on lived-experience, the life-world and description, and on the other from its emphasis on the reduction, reflec- tion and constitution. From the former emphasis there have developed philosophies (Merleau-Ponty's and Marcel's-although Marcel's work did not derive

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1979

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