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Phenomenology as Critical Philosophy

Phenomenology as Critical Philosophy 167 Phenomenology as Critical Philosophy Richard Zaner. The Way of Phenomenology. Pegasus, New York, 1970. 223 pages. What Professor Zaner attempts and what he achieves with remarkable success in this book is most valuable not only for the initiate, but also for the advanced student of phenomenology. What he attempts is actively to introduce the reader into phenomenological philosophizing. With great clarity and pedagogical insight, the author avoids writing a "mere text- book" ; but the study does rely very heavily on Husserl's phenomenological insights and formulations. The book as a whole consists of four chapters plus a lengthy prologue and a short epilogue. Chapter I, "Ways to Phenomenology," presents indirect ways to the concerns of phenomenology. Chapter II, "The Sense of Phenomenology," discusses the fundamental thesis of the book, viz. phenomenology as criticism. In Chapter III, "The Theory of Conscious- ness," there is adequately and clearly presented a Husserlian view of consciousness with the various related themes of intentionality, temporal- ity (or inner time consciousness), and the self. The author concludes in Chapter IV, "The Exigency for Transcendental Philosophy," with the most difficult problem of phenomenology, the transcendental problem. Because of the ancillary character of the third http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Phenomenology as Critical Philosophy

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 3 (1): 167 – Jan 1, 1973

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1973 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916473X00107
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

167 Phenomenology as Critical Philosophy Richard Zaner. The Way of Phenomenology. Pegasus, New York, 1970. 223 pages. What Professor Zaner attempts and what he achieves with remarkable success in this book is most valuable not only for the initiate, but also for the advanced student of phenomenology. What he attempts is actively to introduce the reader into phenomenological philosophizing. With great clarity and pedagogical insight, the author avoids writing a "mere text- book" ; but the study does rely very heavily on Husserl's phenomenological insights and formulations. The book as a whole consists of four chapters plus a lengthy prologue and a short epilogue. Chapter I, "Ways to Phenomenology," presents indirect ways to the concerns of phenomenology. Chapter II, "The Sense of Phenomenology," discusses the fundamental thesis of the book, viz. phenomenology as criticism. In Chapter III, "The Theory of Conscious- ness," there is adequately and clearly presented a Husserlian view of consciousness with the various related themes of intentionality, temporal- ity (or inner time consciousness), and the self. The author concludes in Chapter IV, "The Exigency for Transcendental Philosophy," with the most difficult problem of phenomenology, the transcendental problem. Because of the ancillary character of the third

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1973

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