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Personality versus Territoriality: Belgium and the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities

Personality versus Territoriality: Belgium and the Framework Convention for the Protection of... I. INTRODUCTION On 26 September 2002, Belgium was hit bv a small political storm. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) had just approved a resolution on the Pro- tection of Minorities in Belgium.' Sixty-eight members of the Assembly present and voting endorsed the resolution; twenty-three members present and voting rejected it.2 The resolution urged Belgium to ratify the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (FCNM) and to sign and ratify the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In 1993, the PACE defined as a national minority, 'a group of persons in a state who (1) reside on the territory of that state and are citizens thereof; (2) maintain longstand- ing, firm and lasting ties with that state; (3) display distinctive ethnic, cultural, religious or linguistic characteristics; (4) are sufficiently representative, although smaller in number than the rest of the population of that state or a region of that state, (5) are motivated by the concern to preserve together that which constitutes their common identity, including their culture, their traditions, their religion or their language.'3 With this definition in mind, the 2002 resolution on the Protection of Minorities in Belgium identified as national http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Personality versus Territoriality: Belgium and the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/221161103X00157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION On 26 September 2002, Belgium was hit bv a small political storm. The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) had just approved a resolution on the Pro- tection of Minorities in Belgium.' Sixty-eight members of the Assembly present and voting endorsed the resolution; twenty-three members present and voting rejected it.2 The resolution urged Belgium to ratify the Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities (FCNM) and to sign and ratify the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages. In 1993, the PACE defined as a national minority, 'a group of persons in a state who (1) reside on the territory of that state and are citizens thereof; (2) maintain longstand- ing, firm and lasting ties with that state; (3) display distinctive ethnic, cultural, religious or linguistic characteristics; (4) are sufficiently representative, although smaller in number than the rest of the population of that state or a region of that state, (5) are motivated by the concern to preserve together that which constitutes their common identity, including their culture, their traditions, their religion or their language.'3 With this definition in mind, the 2002 resolution on the Protection of Minorities in Belgium identified as national

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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