Perceived contrast following adaptation: the role of adapting stimulus visibility

Perceived contrast following adaptation: the role of adapting stimulus visibility Spatial Vision , Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 5 – 19 (2002) Ó VSP 2002. Also available online - www.vsppub.com Perceived contrast following adaptation: the role of adapting stimulus visibility BRENDAN T. BARRETT ¤ , PAUL V. MCGRAW and PAUL MORRILL Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, UK Received 1 June 2001; revised 4 September 2001; accepted 12 September 2001 Abstract —The issue of whether contrast adaptation can reduce the perceived contrast of gratings oriented orthogonal to the adapting stimulus to a greater extent than parallel gratings has been the subject of considerable debate (Snowden and Hammett, 1992; Ross and Speed, 1996). We compared the reductions in perceived contrast of various test gratings oriented parallel and orthogonal to the adapting stimulus across a range of spatial frequencies (2.25– 9 c/deg) and adaptation contrasts (0.19– 1.0). Our results show that when the adapting stimulus is low in contrast, parallel adaptation effects are always greater than the effects of orthogonal adaptation. When the adapting contrast is increased, however, the difference between parallel and orthogonal effects is reduced. Further increases in adapting contrast can produce a situation where cross-orientation adaptation effects exceed iso-orientation effects. This was observed at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010) Brill

Perceived contrast following adaptation: the role of adapting stimulus visibility

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2002 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0169-1015
eISSN
1568-5683
D.O.I.
10.1163/15685680260433878
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial Vision , Vol. 16, No. 1, pp. 5 – 19 (2002) Ó VSP 2002. Also available online - www.vsppub.com Perceived contrast following adaptation: the role of adapting stimulus visibility BRENDAN T. BARRETT ¤ , PAUL V. MCGRAW and PAUL MORRILL Department of Optometry, University of Bradford, Bradford BD7 1DP, UK Received 1 June 2001; revised 4 September 2001; accepted 12 September 2001 Abstract —The issue of whether contrast adaptation can reduce the perceived contrast of gratings oriented orthogonal to the adapting stimulus to a greater extent than parallel gratings has been the subject of considerable debate (Snowden and Hammett, 1992; Ross and Speed, 1996). We compared the reductions in perceived contrast of various test gratings oriented parallel and orthogonal to the adapting stimulus across a range of spatial frequencies (2.25– 9 c/deg) and adaptation contrasts (0.19– 1.0). Our results show that when the adapting stimulus is low in contrast, parallel adaptation effects are always greater than the effects of orthogonal adaptation. When the adapting contrast is increased, however, the difference between parallel and orthogonal effects is reduced. Further increases in adapting contrast can produce a situation where cross-orientation adaptation effects exceed iso-orientation effects. This was observed at

Journal

Spatial Vision (continued as Seeing & Perceiving from 2010)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

Keywords: CONTRAST ADAPTATION; ORIENTATION; VISIBILITY.; SPATIAL FREQUENCY

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