Pectoral Fin Kinematics of Coris Formosa (Teleostei, Labridae)

Pectoral Fin Kinematics of Coris Formosa (Teleostei, Labridae) PECTORAL FIN KINEMATICS OF CORIS FORMOSA (TELEOSTEI, LABRIDAE) by P. J. GEERLINK (University of Groningen, Department of Zoology, P.O. Box 14, 9750 AA Haren, The Netherlands) SUMMARY A fish propelling itself by means of the pectoral fins, was filmed with a high speed cine camera. For each film frame the movements of the pectoral fins were analysed and the body velocity calculated. The fin beat cycle can be divided into three phases. The ef fects of each phase on the body velocity are variable, but downstrokes generally cause deceleration and upstrokes acceleration. The intermediate phase sometimes showed acceleration possibly caused by a jet of water squirted out from the space between fin and body wall. The discrepancy between the observed fin shapes and the simplified representation of the fin as a flat plate is discussed. Estimates of drag and swimming force are made. INTRODUCTION Although a majority of teleost fishes use the pectoral fins for steering and auxiliary propulsion, in some fish species these fins are the main locomotive apparatus. Labridae, Chaetodontidae and Acanthuridae swim with their pectorals by means of rowing movements, where the fins act as paddles or hydrofoils. Waves are propagated along the pec- toral http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Netherlands Journal of Zoology (in 2003 continued as Animal Biology) Brill

Pectoral Fin Kinematics of Coris Formosa (Teleostei, Labridae)

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1982 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0028-2960
eISSN
1568-542X
D.O.I.
10.1163/002829683X00237
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PECTORAL FIN KINEMATICS OF CORIS FORMOSA (TELEOSTEI, LABRIDAE) by P. J. GEERLINK (University of Groningen, Department of Zoology, P.O. Box 14, 9750 AA Haren, The Netherlands) SUMMARY A fish propelling itself by means of the pectoral fins, was filmed with a high speed cine camera. For each film frame the movements of the pectoral fins were analysed and the body velocity calculated. The fin beat cycle can be divided into three phases. The ef fects of each phase on the body velocity are variable, but downstrokes generally cause deceleration and upstrokes acceleration. The intermediate phase sometimes showed acceleration possibly caused by a jet of water squirted out from the space between fin and body wall. The discrepancy between the observed fin shapes and the simplified representation of the fin as a flat plate is discussed. Estimates of drag and swimming force are made. INTRODUCTION Although a majority of teleost fishes use the pectoral fins for steering and auxiliary propulsion, in some fish species these fins are the main locomotive apparatus. Labridae, Chaetodontidae and Acanthuridae swim with their pectorals by means of rowing movements, where the fins act as paddles or hydrofoils. Waves are propagated along the pec- toral

Journal

Netherlands Journal of Zoology (in 2003 continued as Animal Biology)Brill

Published: Jan 1, 1982

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