Patterns and processes in the evolution of animal parasitic nematodes

Patterns and processes in the evolution of animal parasitic nematodes Nematology , 2000, Vol. 2(1), 43-55 Symposium Patterns and processes in the evolution of animal parasitic nematodes Mark B LAXTER 1, * , Mark D ORRIS 1 and Paul D E L EY 2 1 Nematode Genetics, Ashworth Laboratories, Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK 2 Vakgroep Biologie, Universiteit Gent, K.L. Ledegankstraat 35, 9000 Gent, Belgium Presented at the symposium ‘Biodiversity in the phylum Nematoda’ , Gent, Belgium, 17 September 1999 Summary – The parasitic Nematoda have traditionally been classiŽ ed distinct from free-living species, and animal parasites treated separately from plant parasites. In classical concepts of phylogenetic relationships within the phylum, parasitic groups are usually afforded ordinal status and their origins are often obscure. We have been using molecular phylogeneticsto examine the interrelationships of animal parasites with free-living and plant-parasitic groups, and Ž nd that a new view of the origins and radiation of animal parasites is warranted. Using sequence from the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, we have constructed an alignment that allows robust phylogenetic inference. With this dataset, we place the Strongylida as a monophyletic clade nested within the Rhabditina. The Ascaridida, Oxyurida and Spirurida are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nematology Brill

Patterns and processes in the evolution of animal parasitic nematodes

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 2000 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1388-5545
eISSN
1568-5411
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854100508881
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nematology , 2000, Vol. 2(1), 43-55 Symposium Patterns and processes in the evolution of animal parasitic nematodes Mark B LAXTER 1, * , Mark D ORRIS 1 and Paul D E L EY 2 1 Nematode Genetics, Ashworth Laboratories, Institute of Cell, Animal and Population Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JT, UK 2 Vakgroep Biologie, Universiteit Gent, K.L. Ledegankstraat 35, 9000 Gent, Belgium Presented at the symposium ‘Biodiversity in the phylum Nematoda’ , Gent, Belgium, 17 September 1999 Summary – The parasitic Nematoda have traditionally been classiŽ ed distinct from free-living species, and animal parasites treated separately from plant parasites. In classical concepts of phylogenetic relationships within the phylum, parasitic groups are usually afforded ordinal status and their origins are often obscure. We have been using molecular phylogeneticsto examine the interrelationships of animal parasites with free-living and plant-parasitic groups, and Ž nd that a new view of the origins and radiation of animal parasites is warranted. Using sequence from the nuclear small subunit ribosomal RNA gene, we have constructed an alignment that allows robust phylogenetic inference. With this dataset, we place the Strongylida as a monophyletic clade nested within the Rhabditina. The Ascaridida, Oxyurida and Spirurida are

Journal

NematologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2000

Keywords: RHABDITOPHANES; STRONGYLIDA; OXYURIDA; PARASITISM; MOLECULAR PHYLOGENETICS; ASCARIDIDA; SPIRURIDA; STRONGYLOIDES

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