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Party System, Electoral Systems and Minority Representation in the Republic of Macedonia from 1990 to 2002†

Party System, Electoral Systems and Minority Representation in the Republic of Macedonia from... I. INTRODUCTION The southernmost republic of Yugoslavia from the constitution of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia in 1946 until the establishment of the Republic of Macedonia as an independent state in 1991, Macedonia has consistently presented itself as a territory inhabited by the members of multiple ethnic groups.' According to the census conducted in Macedonia in 1994, ethnic Macedonians constitute 66.6% of the country's population.' The same census indicates that ethnic Albanians account for 22.7% of the population, ethnic Turks for another 4.0%, Roms for 2.2%, ethnic Serbs for 2.1%, and Vlachs for 0.4%. While these figures have been the subject of much controversy, this very controversy is evidence of Macedonia's multiethnicity.' 3 More than a decade after Macedonia's secession from Yugoslavia, the status of the country as such remains highly tenuous, with several of the characteristics which define Macedonia as a state challenged from both without and within the Republic's borders.' .4 Bulgarian scholars and political figures have denied repeatedly that the literary Mace- donian language is in fact a language, with the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 2001 publishing an atlas of Bulgarian dialects covering all of the Republic of Macedonia as well as southeastern http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online Brill

Party System, Electoral Systems and Minority Representation in the Republic of Macedonia from 1990 to 2002†

European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online , Volume 2 (1): 19 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2211-6117
DOI
10.1163/221161103X00111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I. INTRODUCTION The southernmost republic of Yugoslavia from the constitution of the Federal People's Republic of Yugoslavia in 1946 until the establishment of the Republic of Macedonia as an independent state in 1991, Macedonia has consistently presented itself as a territory inhabited by the members of multiple ethnic groups.' According to the census conducted in Macedonia in 1994, ethnic Macedonians constitute 66.6% of the country's population.' The same census indicates that ethnic Albanians account for 22.7% of the population, ethnic Turks for another 4.0%, Roms for 2.2%, ethnic Serbs for 2.1%, and Vlachs for 0.4%. While these figures have been the subject of much controversy, this very controversy is evidence of Macedonia's multiethnicity.' 3 More than a decade after Macedonia's secession from Yugoslavia, the status of the country as such remains highly tenuous, with several of the characteristics which define Macedonia as a state challenged from both without and within the Republic's borders.' .4 Bulgarian scholars and political figures have denied repeatedly that the literary Mace- donian language is in fact a language, with the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences in 2001 publishing an atlas of Bulgarian dialects covering all of the Republic of Macedonia as well as southeastern

Journal

European Yearbook of Minority Issues OnlineBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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