Partnerships in the social system of a small macropod marsupial, the quokka (Setonix brachyurus)

Partnerships in the social system of a small macropod marsupial, the quokka (Setonix brachyurus) Partnerships in the social system of a small macropod marsupial, the quokka ( Setonix brachyurus ) Ian G. McLean 1,2,4) , Elissa Z. Cameron 1,2,3,5) , Wayne L. Linklater 1,2,6) , Natalie T. Schmitt 1,2) & Karin S.M. Pulskamp 1,2,7) ( 1 Department of Zoology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia; 2 Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, West Perth, WA 6005, Australia; 3 Mammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa) (Accepted: 23 May 2008) Summary We detail the social behaviour of the quokka, a small macropod marsupial. Most of the study population were habituated to humans, and were individually marked, and weighed regularly. Males formed a dominance hierarchy and interacted regularly. Heavier males were the most dominant, and spent most time with females. There was a tendency for males to defend a female after mating, but not at other times. Females rarely initiated interactions and appeared to avoid associating with other females. Males routinely attempted to form liaisons with females, but most liaisons lasted for < 10 min. Consistency in the liaisons formed indicated partner preferences (‘consorts’), and these lasted at least two breeding seasons. Females formed a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Partnerships in the social system of a small macropod marsupial, the quokka (Setonix brachyurus)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/partnerships-in-the-social-system-of-a-small-macropod-marsupial-the-jdvE8hJ0Xu
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2009 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853908X390940
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Partnerships in the social system of a small macropod marsupial, the quokka ( Setonix brachyurus ) Ian G. McLean 1,2,4) , Elissa Z. Cameron 1,2,3,5) , Wayne L. Linklater 1,2,6) , Natalie T. Schmitt 1,2) & Karin S.M. Pulskamp 1,2,7) ( 1 Department of Zoology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA 6907, Australia; 2 Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, West Perth, WA 6005, Australia; 3 Mammal Research Institute, Department of Zoology and Entomology, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002, South Africa) (Accepted: 23 May 2008) Summary We detail the social behaviour of the quokka, a small macropod marsupial. Most of the study population were habituated to humans, and were individually marked, and weighed regularly. Males formed a dominance hierarchy and interacted regularly. Heavier males were the most dominant, and spent most time with females. There was a tendency for males to defend a female after mating, but not at other times. Females rarely initiated interactions and appeared to avoid associating with other females. Males routinely attempted to form liaisons with females, but most liaisons lasted for < 10 min. Consistency in the liaisons formed indicated partner preferences (‘consorts’), and these lasted at least two breeding seasons. Females formed a

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2009

Keywords: SOCIAL SYSTEM; MARSUPIAL; SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off