Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Participation through Publics: Did Dewey answer Lippmann?

Participation through Publics: Did Dewey answer Lippmann? Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 7, No. 1 (June 2010), 49­68 Editions Rodopi © 2010 James Bohman John Dewey's Public and its Problems provides his fullest account of democracy under the emerging conditions of complex, modern societies. While responding to Lippmann's criticisms of democracy as self-rule, Dewey acknowledges the truth of many of the social scientific criticisms of democracy, while he defends democracy by reconstructing it. Dewey seeks a new public in a "Great Community" based on more face-to-face communication about nonlocal issues. Yet Dewey fails to consistently apply his own reconstructive argument, retreating to a communal basis for democracy. I offer an extension of Dewey's argument in this direction in which "publics" and not "the public" offer the best basis for reconstructing democracy. A common interpretation of The Public and its Problems is that Dewey sought to defend democracy from its many social scientific and psychological detractors, including Walter Lippmann. He does so not by weakening the democratic ideal to fit contemporary circumstances in the manner of Robert Dahl's "pluralist" conception of democracy. Rather, he seeks to strengthen it, so that democracy is once again a participatory ideal and an ethos that applies to all modern associations and institutions http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

Participation through Publics: Did Dewey answer Lippmann?

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 7 (1): 49 – Apr 21, 2010

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/participation-through-publics-did-dewey-answer-lippmann-c0BoZ9YkRw
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2010 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000155
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 7, No. 1 (June 2010), 49­68 Editions Rodopi © 2010 James Bohman John Dewey's Public and its Problems provides his fullest account of democracy under the emerging conditions of complex, modern societies. While responding to Lippmann's criticisms of democracy as self-rule, Dewey acknowledges the truth of many of the social scientific criticisms of democracy, while he defends democracy by reconstructing it. Dewey seeks a new public in a "Great Community" based on more face-to-face communication about nonlocal issues. Yet Dewey fails to consistently apply his own reconstructive argument, retreating to a communal basis for democracy. I offer an extension of Dewey's argument in this direction in which "publics" and not "the public" offer the best basis for reconstructing democracy. A common interpretation of The Public and its Problems is that Dewey sought to defend democracy from its many social scientific and psychological detractors, including Walter Lippmann. He does so not by weakening the democratic ideal to fit contemporary circumstances in the manner of Robert Dahl's "pluralist" conception of democracy. Rather, he seeks to strengthen it, so that democracy is once again a participatory ideal and an ethos that applies to all modern associations and institutions

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2010

There are no references for this article.