Parasites and Male Ornaments in Free-Ranging and Captive Red Jungle Fowl

Parasites and Male Ornaments in Free-Ranging and Captive Red Jungle Fowl PARASITES AND MALE ORNAMENTS IN FREE-RANGING AND CAPTIVE RED JUNGLE FOWL by MARLENE ZUK1), KRISTINE JOHNSON2)3), RANDY THORNHILL2) and J. DAVID LIGON2)4) (Department of Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA 925211, and Depart- ment of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 871312, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 1-XII-1989) Introduction Since its presentation several years ago, the hypothesis that parasites play a crucial role in sexual selection has been the subject of much speculation, some controversy, and a few empirical tests (HAMILTON & ZUK, 1982, 1989; READ, 1987, 1988; READ & HARVEY, 1989; ENDLER & LYLES, 1989; ZUK, 1989). The idea that parasites as an important evolutionary force have been largely and wrongfully ignored by behavioural ecologists and ethologists is becoming virtually uncontested (DoBSON & HUDSON, 1986; SCOTT & DoBSON, 1989), and study of the behavioral effects of parasitism is increasing (BARNARD & BEHNKE, 1990). Several researchers have sug- gested that pathogens and avoidance of infection have affected such aspects of ecology as population dynamics, predator-prey relations, or the evolution of social groups (HUDSON, 1986; FREELAND, 1976). More problematic is the issue of how parasite-host interactions may have caused selection for exaggerated male secondary sex characters and 3) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Parasites and Male Ornaments in Free-Ranging and Captive Red Jungle Fowl

Behaviour, Volume 114 (1-4): 232 – Jan 1, 1990

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1990 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156853990X00149
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PARASITES AND MALE ORNAMENTS IN FREE-RANGING AND CAPTIVE RED JUNGLE FOWL by MARLENE ZUK1), KRISTINE JOHNSON2)3), RANDY THORNHILL2) and J. DAVID LIGON2)4) (Department of Biology, University of California, Riverside, CA 925211, and Depart- ment of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 871312, U.S.A.) (With 2 Figures) (Acc. 1-XII-1989) Introduction Since its presentation several years ago, the hypothesis that parasites play a crucial role in sexual selection has been the subject of much speculation, some controversy, and a few empirical tests (HAMILTON & ZUK, 1982, 1989; READ, 1987, 1988; READ & HARVEY, 1989; ENDLER & LYLES, 1989; ZUK, 1989). The idea that parasites as an important evolutionary force have been largely and wrongfully ignored by behavioural ecologists and ethologists is becoming virtually uncontested (DoBSON & HUDSON, 1986; SCOTT & DoBSON, 1989), and study of the behavioral effects of parasitism is increasing (BARNARD & BEHNKE, 1990). Several researchers have sug- gested that pathogens and avoidance of infection have affected such aspects of ecology as population dynamics, predator-prey relations, or the evolution of social groups (HUDSON, 1986; FREELAND, 1976). More problematic is the issue of how parasite-host interactions may have caused selection for exaggerated male secondary sex characters and 3)

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1990

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