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Panaceas After Pandemonium? Truth Commissions in the Wake of Protracted Conflicts

Panaceas After Pandemonium? Truth Commissions in the Wake of Protracted Conflicts Global Governance 21 (2015), 343–350 THE GLOBAL FORUM Panaceas After Pandemonium? Truth Commissions in the Wake of Protracted Conflicts Jorge Heine and Joseph F. Turcotte THE THIRD WAVE OF DEMOCRATIZATION HAS MEANT THE END OF AUTOCRATIC rule and oppressive state-sponsored practices in many countries around the world. Yet the transition from authoritarianism and state-sponsored terror to more open and participatory societies has its own imperatives. After auto- cratic rule and protracted conflicts, it is necessary to heal the wounds caused by years, sometimes decades, of mistrust, fear, and violence. Sys- tematic violations of human rights, in the form of oppression, physical and psychological violence, and death, leave lasting individual and collective wounds. Transitional (or restorative) justice is designed to address and (hopefully) mitigate such legacies left by the previous regime. In doing so, it draws on a variety of instruments: criminal prosecutions, special tri- bunals, amnesties, apologies, memorials, lustrations, and truth commissions (TCs), among others. The end of the Cold War also gave a new impetus to international criminal justice. Special tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, for Rwanda, and for Sierra Leone were established, as was, most promi- nently, the International Criminal Court, originated in the 1999 Rome Treaty http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Panaceas After Pandemonium? Truth Commissions in the Wake of Protracted Conflicts

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-02103001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 21 (2015), 343–350 THE GLOBAL FORUM Panaceas After Pandemonium? Truth Commissions in the Wake of Protracted Conflicts Jorge Heine and Joseph F. Turcotte THE THIRD WAVE OF DEMOCRATIZATION HAS MEANT THE END OF AUTOCRATIC rule and oppressive state-sponsored practices in many countries around the world. Yet the transition from authoritarianism and state-sponsored terror to more open and participatory societies has its own imperatives. After auto- cratic rule and protracted conflicts, it is necessary to heal the wounds caused by years, sometimes decades, of mistrust, fear, and violence. Sys- tematic violations of human rights, in the form of oppression, physical and psychological violence, and death, leave lasting individual and collective wounds. Transitional (or restorative) justice is designed to address and (hopefully) mitigate such legacies left by the previous regime. In doing so, it draws on a variety of instruments: criminal prosecutions, special tri- bunals, amnesties, apologies, memorials, lustrations, and truth commissions (TCs), among others. The end of the Cold War also gave a new impetus to international criminal justice. Special tribunals for the former Yugoslavia, for Rwanda, and for Sierra Leone were established, as was, most promi- nently, the International Criminal Court, originated in the 1999 Rome Treaty

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 19, 2015

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