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Pacing Transhumance

Pacing Transhumance AbstractFor Indigenous Soyot herder-hunters of the Eastern Sayan Mountains in western Buryatia, maintaining a sustainable multispecies encampment is a matter of pacing the individual rhythms of the species belonging to it. Domestication in this context is not a matter of human control but of attuning and influencing life rhythms in other beings. Formerly divided into yak and reindeer herding groups, contemporary Soyots no longer rely on reindeer today. Meanwhile, their Tofa neighbours continue to use trained reindeer in their hunting. This paper explores possible reasons for the gradual abandonment of Soyot reindeer herding in the mid nineteenth century, drawing on irreconcilable rhythms. Four regional strategies for coping with divergent species’ rhythms are explored: abandonment of a species in a rangifer-cattle context; alignment of yak and Mongolian cattle reproductive rhythms for hybrid production; juxtaposition of equine and rangifer rhythms; and inversion of cattle and fish migratory routes. The article concludes with a new theory to help address rhythmical multispecies togetherness in the Eastern Sayan Mountains. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Inner Asia Brill

Pacing Transhumance

Inner Asia , Volume 22 (1): 20 – Apr 24, 2020

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1464-8172
eISSN
2210-5018
DOI
10.1163/22105018-12340136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbstractFor Indigenous Soyot herder-hunters of the Eastern Sayan Mountains in western Buryatia, maintaining a sustainable multispecies encampment is a matter of pacing the individual rhythms of the species belonging to it. Domestication in this context is not a matter of human control but of attuning and influencing life rhythms in other beings. Formerly divided into yak and reindeer herding groups, contemporary Soyots no longer rely on reindeer today. Meanwhile, their Tofa neighbours continue to use trained reindeer in their hunting. This paper explores possible reasons for the gradual abandonment of Soyot reindeer herding in the mid nineteenth century, drawing on irreconcilable rhythms. Four regional strategies for coping with divergent species’ rhythms are explored: abandonment of a species in a rangifer-cattle context; alignment of yak and Mongolian cattle reproductive rhythms for hybrid production; juxtaposition of equine and rangifer rhythms; and inversion of cattle and fish migratory routes. The article concludes with a new theory to help address rhythmical multispecies togetherness in the Eastern Sayan Mountains.

Journal

Inner AsiaBrill

Published: Apr 24, 2020

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