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Our Addictions

Our Addictions Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 2004), 159-169 Editions Rodopi © 2004 Bruce Wilshire. Wild Hunger: The Primal Roots of Modern Addiction. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. Pp. xv + 283. ISBN 0-8476-8967-0 Many of the healing professions have pursued a larger vision of health by understanding their activities as more than curing diseases. Therefore it is likely that a breakthrough in understanding the basic nature of addiction would be welcome news and worthy of thought. Like most large-scale changes, however, careful preparation is necessary for a firm grasp. So first we consider some important background material which will display an antiquated yet still commonly found theory of human nature. With that preparation we will be ready to explore an important new book which might offer a significant improvement in the way we conceive the nest of problems surrounding addiction. In The Principles of Art, among the most inspiring interdisciplinary books of our age, spectacular yet underused, Robin George Collingwood -- distinguished historian of Roman Britain, scientist, aesthetician, idealist, and pragmatist -- made a surprising statement: Magical activity is a kind of dynamo supplying the mechanisms of practical life with the emotional current that drives it. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2004 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000134
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 2004), 159-169 Editions Rodopi © 2004 Bruce Wilshire. Wild Hunger: The Primal Roots of Modern Addiction. Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998. Pp. xv + 283. ISBN 0-8476-8967-0 Many of the healing professions have pursued a larger vision of health by understanding their activities as more than curing diseases. Therefore it is likely that a breakthrough in understanding the basic nature of addiction would be welcome news and worthy of thought. Like most large-scale changes, however, careful preparation is necessary for a firm grasp. So first we consider some important background material which will display an antiquated yet still commonly found theory of human nature. With that preparation we will be ready to explore an important new book which might offer a significant improvement in the way we conceive the nest of problems surrounding addiction. In The Principles of Art, among the most inspiring interdisciplinary books of our age, spectacular yet underused, Robin George Collingwood -- distinguished historian of Roman Britain, scientist, aesthetician, idealist, and pragmatist -- made a surprising statement: Magical activity is a kind of dynamo supplying the mechanisms of practical life with the emotional current that drives it.

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2004

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