Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

ORNAMENTS OF EMPOWERMENT THE KUNDALA-SUBANG IN OLD JAVANESE JEWELLERY

ORNAMENTS OF EMPOWERMENT THE KUNDALA-SUBANG IN OLD JAVANESE JEWELLERY John Guy ORNAMENTS OF EMPOWERMENT THE KUNDALA-SUBANG IN OLD JAVANESE JEWELLERY The arts of Central and Eastern Java, spanning from the late 8th to the 16th centuries, are rich in visual imagery of jewellery and other forms of precious adornment. The icons of Hindu and Buddhist deities associated with the major religious cults of the period are depicted lavishly embellished with jewellery, which we know from the archaeological record represents precious metal items, most notably gold. Random accidental discoveries of ancient Javanese gold jewellery are reported from the beginning of the Dutch archaeological records under the Batavia Society and the Archaeological Service of the Netherlands East Indies (Oudheidkundig Verslag, 1912-1949), and thereafter by the Archaeological Service of Indonesia. The most significant finds include the Muturen hoard (1881) and more than a century later the Wonoboyo hoard (1990-91), the single most important discovery of Javanese gold artefacts to date.1 The cumulative record from Java is spectacular, far outnumbering the finds of antique jewellery in the Indian subcontinent for the equivalent period. These items of adornment, be they for human or divine bodies, can assume many forms. Taken together they represent an elaborate ensemble of adornment: from head to toe the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aziatische Kunst Brill

ORNAMENTS OF EMPOWERMENT THE KUNDALA-SUBANG IN OLD JAVANESE JEWELLERY

Aziatische Kunst , Volume 38 (4): 7 – Jul 5, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/ornaments-of-empowerment-the-kundala-subang-in-old-javanese-jewellery-J0wZuI4int
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
eISSN
2543-1749
DOI
10.1163/25431749-90000158
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

John Guy ORNAMENTS OF EMPOWERMENT THE KUNDALA-SUBANG IN OLD JAVANESE JEWELLERY The arts of Central and Eastern Java, spanning from the late 8th to the 16th centuries, are rich in visual imagery of jewellery and other forms of precious adornment. The icons of Hindu and Buddhist deities associated with the major religious cults of the period are depicted lavishly embellished with jewellery, which we know from the archaeological record represents precious metal items, most notably gold. Random accidental discoveries of ancient Javanese gold jewellery are reported from the beginning of the Dutch archaeological records under the Batavia Society and the Archaeological Service of the Netherlands East Indies (Oudheidkundig Verslag, 1912-1949), and thereafter by the Archaeological Service of Indonesia. The most significant finds include the Muturen hoard (1881) and more than a century later the Wonoboyo hoard (1990-91), the single most important discovery of Javanese gold artefacts to date.1 The cumulative record from Java is spectacular, far outnumbering the finds of antique jewellery in the Indian subcontinent for the equivalent period. These items of adornment, be they for human or divine bodies, can assume many forms. Taken together they represent an elaborate ensemble of adornment: from head to toe the

Journal

Aziatische KunstBrill

Published: Jul 5, 2008

There are no references for this article.