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Operationalizing the Responsibility to Protect—the Policekeeping Approach

Operationalizing the Responsibility to Protect—the Policekeeping Approach Global Governance 11 (2005), 139–146 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Operationalizing the Responsibility to Protect— the Policekeeping Approach Graham Day and Christopher Freeman t the battle of Solferino, Henri Dunant was so appalled by the loss of life that he founded what became the International Red ACross movement to mitigate the most barbaric effects of modern warfare. His concept was that an agreement between states, the Geneva Conventions, could regulate the conduct of combatants along more humane lines. Since then, the transformation from conflict between states to conflict between peoples within states has fundamentally altered the moral and political space within which such initiatives take place. In Srebrenica, Rwanda, and a long list of orphaned conflicts, neu- trality has often cost lives rather than saved them. Doing “no harm” has sometimes meant doing nothing at all, whereas aggressive military operations in support of humanitarian objectives in Somalia and Iraq have produced their own conflicts. Understandably, the consensus has increasingly been that if humanitarianism is to retain credibility it must devise better methods to safeguard human security: it needs a third way. To resolve the dilemmas of state failure that emerged in the 1990s, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan asked for an International Commission http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International Organizations Brill

Operationalizing the Responsibility to Protect—the Policekeeping Approach

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1075-2846
eISSN
1942-6720
DOI
10.1163/19426720-01102002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Global Governance 11 (2005), 139–146 GLOBAL INSIGHTS Operationalizing the Responsibility to Protect— the Policekeeping Approach Graham Day and Christopher Freeman t the battle of Solferino, Henri Dunant was so appalled by the loss of life that he founded what became the International Red ACross movement to mitigate the most barbaric effects of modern warfare. His concept was that an agreement between states, the Geneva Conventions, could regulate the conduct of combatants along more humane lines. Since then, the transformation from conflict between states to conflict between peoples within states has fundamentally altered the moral and political space within which such initiatives take place. In Srebrenica, Rwanda, and a long list of orphaned conflicts, neu- trality has often cost lives rather than saved them. Doing “no harm” has sometimes meant doing nothing at all, whereas aggressive military operations in support of humanitarian objectives in Somalia and Iraq have produced their own conflicts. Understandably, the consensus has increasingly been that if humanitarianism is to retain credibility it must devise better methods to safeguard human security: it needs a third way. To resolve the dilemmas of state failure that emerged in the 1990s, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan asked for an International Commission

Journal

Global Governance: A Review of Multilateralism and International OrganizationsBrill

Published: Aug 3, 2005

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