Ontological Insecurity and Reflective Processes

Ontological Insecurity and Reflective Processes 203 ONTOLOGICAL INSECURITY AND REFLECTIVE PROCESSES Stephan P. Spitzer The ability to specify the end states which the human organism is committed to maintain makes it possible for theories of anxiety to identify the stimuli which threaten to detract from those states, and thus elicit anxiety responses. And while the ob- jectives which the human is committed to maintain are multifarious, and the means to those ends are equally diversified, the ground work for the study of anxiety was laid by a theorist for whom the end state specified and the means to the end were one and the same. In Kierkegaard's (1844, 1849) theory of anxiety the basic ob- jective of the organism, i.e., the affirmation of existence, is at- tained via the act by which existence is affirmed. While this may appear tautological, it means simply that the end state to which the organism is directed is a state in which it is aware of itself (reflective), and this state is reached by the act of placing itself in its own field of view (reflection). Insofar as reflective processes are concerned, it is Kierkegaard's contention that the development of such processes provide the machinery by which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Phenomenological Psychology Brill

Ontological Insecurity and Reflective Processes

Journal of Phenomenological Psychology, Volume 8 (2): 203 – Jan 1, 1977

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1977 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0047-2662
eISSN
1569-1624
D.O.I.
10.1163/156916278X00186
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

203 ONTOLOGICAL INSECURITY AND REFLECTIVE PROCESSES Stephan P. Spitzer The ability to specify the end states which the human organism is committed to maintain makes it possible for theories of anxiety to identify the stimuli which threaten to detract from those states, and thus elicit anxiety responses. And while the ob- jectives which the human is committed to maintain are multifarious, and the means to those ends are equally diversified, the ground work for the study of anxiety was laid by a theorist for whom the end state specified and the means to the end were one and the same. In Kierkegaard's (1844, 1849) theory of anxiety the basic ob- jective of the organism, i.e., the affirmation of existence, is at- tained via the act by which existence is affirmed. While this may appear tautological, it means simply that the end state to which the organism is directed is a state in which it is aware of itself (reflective), and this state is reached by the act of placing itself in its own field of view (reflection). Insofar as reflective processes are concerned, it is Kierkegaard's contention that the development of such processes provide the machinery by which

Journal

Journal of Phenomenological PsychologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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