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On Thematization

On Thematization 35 On Thematization ARON GURWITSCH Edited by Lester Embree No more can be offered here than a provisional characterization of the operation of thematization and a general indication of the lines along which it operates. Rather than stating at the outset the importance which thematization may have for some problems arising in Husserlian phenom- enology, it seems more opportune to make this importance appear in the course of the discussion. Thematization may be understood in a very broad sense to denote any change or modification of thematic consciousness. Sitting at our desk, we are perceptually occupied with a book or-as it is usually put-we devote our attention to the book, while at the same time we perceive a sheet of paper also lying on the desk and pertaining to the perceptual surroundings or-as I have called it-the thematic field of the book, which is our actual theme. We are free to change the direction of our perceptual attention so as to devote it to the sheet of paper. What previously had been a "potential" theme, that is to say a segregated unit within the thematic field and, hence, a component of the latter, now becomes a theme in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

On Thematization

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 4 (1): 35 – Jan 1, 1974

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1974 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916474X00070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

35 On Thematization ARON GURWITSCH Edited by Lester Embree No more can be offered here than a provisional characterization of the operation of thematization and a general indication of the lines along which it operates. Rather than stating at the outset the importance which thematization may have for some problems arising in Husserlian phenom- enology, it seems more opportune to make this importance appear in the course of the discussion. Thematization may be understood in a very broad sense to denote any change or modification of thematic consciousness. Sitting at our desk, we are perceptually occupied with a book or-as it is usually put-we devote our attention to the book, while at the same time we perceive a sheet of paper also lying on the desk and pertaining to the perceptual surroundings or-as I have called it-the thematic field of the book, which is our actual theme. We are free to change the direction of our perceptual attention so as to devote it to the sheet of paper. What previously had been a "potential" theme, that is to say a segregated unit within the thematic field and, hence, a component of the latter, now becomes a theme in

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1974

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