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On the Unity of Heidegger's Thought

On the Unity of Heidegger's Thought 263 On the Unity of Heidegger's Thought David Farrell Krell, Intimations of Mortality: Time, Truth, and Finitude in Heidegger's Thinking of Being. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1986, 201 pp. There are many Heidegger's drawn in many interpretations. Krell's Heidegger is given by studies of the many-sided unifying project of his thought, a project that continued throughout his complex and difficult career. The unity of Heidegger's work is found, as we shall see, in the turns and reversals of his thinking. One of the most characteristic aspects of Heidegger was the way his thought turned back on itself. His wit as well as his serious reflections usually bowed back, sometimes like a fish hook, sometimes like a figure 8; and the dominant, clear direction that his words took-say, a complimentary evaluation or a straightforward exposition- would suddenly turn, creating a different direction, a sense of a different horizon, and, above all, letting a fracture, an inadequacy, or the fading of a previous clarity become apparent. Krell's detailed discussion of this characteristic of his thought, combined with accounts of his lifelong and intense preoccupation with the Western philosophical tradition, provide a particularly concrete view of the way Heidegger's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

On the Unity of Heidegger's Thought

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 17 (1): 263 – Jan 1, 1987

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1987 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916487X00148
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

263 On the Unity of Heidegger's Thought David Farrell Krell, Intimations of Mortality: Time, Truth, and Finitude in Heidegger's Thinking of Being. University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1986, 201 pp. There are many Heidegger's drawn in many interpretations. Krell's Heidegger is given by studies of the many-sided unifying project of his thought, a project that continued throughout his complex and difficult career. The unity of Heidegger's work is found, as we shall see, in the turns and reversals of his thinking. One of the most characteristic aspects of Heidegger was the way his thought turned back on itself. His wit as well as his serious reflections usually bowed back, sometimes like a fish hook, sometimes like a figure 8; and the dominant, clear direction that his words took-say, a complimentary evaluation or a straightforward exposition- would suddenly turn, creating a different direction, a sense of a different horizon, and, above all, letting a fracture, an inadequacy, or the fading of a previous clarity become apparent. Krell's detailed discussion of this characteristic of his thought, combined with accounts of his lifelong and intense preoccupation with the Western philosophical tradition, provide a particularly concrete view of the way Heidegger's

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1987

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