On the Thoracic Sternum in the Subfamily Hexapodinae (Brachyura, Goneplacidae)

On the Thoracic Sternum in the Subfamily Hexapodinae (Brachyura, Goneplacidae) NOTES AND NEWS ON THE THORACIC STERNUM IN THE SUBFAMILY HEXAPODINAE (BRACHYURA, GONEPLACIDAE) BY ISABELLA GORDON British Museum (Natural History), London, Great Britain 1. THE LAST THORACIC STERNITES In adults of the small subfamily Hexapodinae the last pair of pereiopods, with one exception to be mentioned later, is completely suppressed. It was natural, therefore, that earlier carcinologists should have supposed that the last thoracic somite had also disappeared (see: Alcock, 1900: 287; Balss, 1957 in Bronn's Klassen und Ordnungen des Tierreichs, 5 (1) (7) (12): 1658). They also thought that "the efferent ducts of the male sex open on the 4th sternal segment inside the fossa into which the abdomen fits" (Alcock, 1900: 330). Barnard (1950: 300, fig. 56g) was the first to observe that in the male of Hexapus .rteb- bingi, his new species for the H. sexpes of Stebbing, "there is a short 5th sternite, at the inner end of which emerges the external continuation of the vas I have examined the scanty material of the Hexapodinae in the British Museum collection and can vouch for the correctness of Barnard's statement. But, since the posterior carapacial margin overlaps a narrow strip along the posterior border of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crustaceana Brill

On the Thoracic Sternum in the Subfamily Hexapodinae (Brachyura, Goneplacidae)

Crustaceana, Volume 21 (1): 106 – Jan 1, 1971

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1971 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0011-216x
eISSN
1568-5403
D.O.I.
10.1163/156854071X00274
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOTES AND NEWS ON THE THORACIC STERNUM IN THE SUBFAMILY HEXAPODINAE (BRACHYURA, GONEPLACIDAE) BY ISABELLA GORDON British Museum (Natural History), London, Great Britain 1. THE LAST THORACIC STERNITES In adults of the small subfamily Hexapodinae the last pair of pereiopods, with one exception to be mentioned later, is completely suppressed. It was natural, therefore, that earlier carcinologists should have supposed that the last thoracic somite had also disappeared (see: Alcock, 1900: 287; Balss, 1957 in Bronn's Klassen und Ordnungen des Tierreichs, 5 (1) (7) (12): 1658). They also thought that "the efferent ducts of the male sex open on the 4th sternal segment inside the fossa into which the abdomen fits" (Alcock, 1900: 330). Barnard (1950: 300, fig. 56g) was the first to observe that in the male of Hexapus .rteb- bingi, his new species for the H. sexpes of Stebbing, "there is a short 5th sternite, at the inner end of which emerges the external continuation of the vas I have examined the scanty material of the Hexapodinae in the British Museum collection and can vouch for the correctness of Barnard's statement. But, since the posterior carapacial margin overlaps a narrow strip along the posterior border of

Journal

CrustaceanaBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1971

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