"On the Shop Floor: Guilds, Artisans, and the European Market Economy, 1350-1750"

"On the Shop Floor: Guilds, Artisans, and the European Market Economy, 1350-1750" "ON THE SHOP FLOOR: GUILDS, ARTISANS, AND THE EUROPEAN MARKET ECONOMY, 1350-1750"* JAMES R. FARR Purdue Universi-y Introduction Much of the historical writing on the urban craft or manufacturing economy in the early modern era has focused on guilds and, more- over, has been bedeviled by a lack of distinction between the theoret- ical nature of the guild system and actual economic practice. Historians of this economy frequently ask two related questions: What role did guilds play in the functioning of the market economy? And what impact did guild regulations have upon economic development? Until recently historians had assumed that the tight regulatory regime that the guild system pronounced in its statutes, and that municipal, ducal, or royal governments endorsed in legislation, restricted economic growth, and thus strait jacketed the development of free market capitalism in places where the guild system was most firmly entrenched.' This argument frequently rests upon the assertion that the English experience was different, and that part of the explanation for the vitality of England's economy and its technological innovations in the eighteenth century can be traced to the moribund nature of its guilds. Conversely, French economic and technological "backwardness" has likewise, in part, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Early Modern History Brill

"On the Shop Floor: Guilds, Artisans, and the European Market Economy, 1350-1750"

Journal of Early Modern History, Volume 1 (1): 24 – Jan 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/on-the-shop-floor-guilds-artisans-and-the-european-market-economy-1350-6DScXhFTj7
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1385-3783
eISSN
1570-0658
D.O.I.
10.1163/157006597X00217
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"ON THE SHOP FLOOR: GUILDS, ARTISANS, AND THE EUROPEAN MARKET ECONOMY, 1350-1750"* JAMES R. FARR Purdue Universi-y Introduction Much of the historical writing on the urban craft or manufacturing economy in the early modern era has focused on guilds and, more- over, has been bedeviled by a lack of distinction between the theoret- ical nature of the guild system and actual economic practice. Historians of this economy frequently ask two related questions: What role did guilds play in the functioning of the market economy? And what impact did guild regulations have upon economic development? Until recently historians had assumed that the tight regulatory regime that the guild system pronounced in its statutes, and that municipal, ducal, or royal governments endorsed in legislation, restricted economic growth, and thus strait jacketed the development of free market capitalism in places where the guild system was most firmly entrenched.' This argument frequently rests upon the assertion that the English experience was different, and that part of the explanation for the vitality of England's economy and its technological innovations in the eighteenth century can be traced to the moribund nature of its guilds. Conversely, French economic and technological "backwardness" has likewise, in part,

Journal

Journal of Early Modern HistoryBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off