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On the Parmenidean Misconception

On the Parmenidean Misconception Fernando Ferreira, Universidade de Lisboa Parmenides did not write as a cosmologist. He wrote as a philosophical pioneer of the first water, and any attempt to put him back into the tradition that he aimed to demolish is a surrender to the diadoche-writers, a failure to take him at his word […] G. E. L. Owen The work of Parmenides posed a difficult philosophical challenge to those not willing to accept its conclusions. Even to those who could be tempted to consid- er the conclusions of Parmenides a reductio ad absurdum of his views, it would not have been sufficient to dismiss them without further ado. Consider, for instance, the dialogue between the unguarded Ctesippus and the sophisticated eleatic Euthydemus in Plato’s homonymous piece: Euthydemus Well then, Ctesippus, do you think it is possible to tell a lie? Ctesippus By Zeus I do, unless I’ve gone mad. Euthydemus If one lies, does one speak of the subject matter that one’s speech is about, or does one not speak of it? Ctesippus Onedoesspeak of it. Euthydemus So if one speaks of this, does one speak of anything else among the things that are, apart from the very thing of which http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis Brill

On the Parmenidean Misconception

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2666-4283
eISSN
2666-4275
DOI
10.30965/26664275-00201005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fernando Ferreira, Universidade de Lisboa Parmenides did not write as a cosmologist. He wrote as a philosophical pioneer of the first water, and any attempt to put him back into the tradition that he aimed to demolish is a surrender to the diadoche-writers, a failure to take him at his word […] G. E. L. Owen The work of Parmenides posed a difficult philosophical challenge to those not willing to accept its conclusions. Even to those who could be tempted to consid- er the conclusions of Parmenides a reductio ad absurdum of his views, it would not have been sufficient to dismiss them without further ado. Consider, for instance, the dialogue between the unguarded Ctesippus and the sophisticated eleatic Euthydemus in Plato’s homonymous piece: Euthydemus Well then, Ctesippus, do you think it is possible to tell a lie? Ctesippus By Zeus I do, unless I’ve gone mad. Euthydemus If one lies, does one speak of the subject matter that one’s speech is about, or does one not speak of it? Ctesippus Onedoesspeak of it. Euthydemus So if one speaks of this, does one speak of anything else among the things that are, apart from the very thing of which

Journal

History of Philosophy and Logical AnalysisBrill

Published: Apr 5, 1999

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