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On Democratic Experimentalism: Toward a Culture of Love and Non-Violence

On Democratic Experimentalism: Toward a Culture of Love and Non-Violence Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 9, No. 2 (December 2012), 287­299 Editions Rodopi ©2012 This essay rethinks democratic experimentalism from an ethical point of view, and look at its potential for the future by drawing on two key thinkers of the late 20th and early 21st century: Richard Rorty and Luce Irigaray. I explore the experimentalist character in Irigaray's later thought and point to a pragmatist link in her works, and then dynamize her original theory of sexual difference by pointing to G.H. Mead's symbolic interactionism. Then a revolutionary character of Irigaray's thought is defended by focusing on her interventions into the very core of Western philosophy and in particular its Hegelian heritage. By introducing Rorty into the debate, a pledge is made for a new democratic culture of love and nonviolence as a `spiritual' mode of democratic experimentalism needed in our times. Finally, I show that Irigaray's and Rorty's thought share an affinity toward intercultural thinking, bearing important consequences for an ethicospiritual project of democratic experimentalism. 1. One of the foremost tasks of our age, according to Fred Dallmayr, is to reconnect ethics with politics. This can mean, firstly, to push the liberal conception of politics towards the so-called http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Pragmatism Brill

On Democratic Experimentalism: Toward a Culture of Love and Non-Violence

Contemporary Pragmatism , Volume 9 (2): 287 – Apr 21, 2012

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© Copyright 2012 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1572-3429
eISSN
1875-8185
DOI
10.1163/18758185-90000242
Publisher site
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Abstract

Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 9, No. 2 (December 2012), 287­299 Editions Rodopi ©2012 This essay rethinks democratic experimentalism from an ethical point of view, and look at its potential for the future by drawing on two key thinkers of the late 20th and early 21st century: Richard Rorty and Luce Irigaray. I explore the experimentalist character in Irigaray's later thought and point to a pragmatist link in her works, and then dynamize her original theory of sexual difference by pointing to G.H. Mead's symbolic interactionism. Then a revolutionary character of Irigaray's thought is defended by focusing on her interventions into the very core of Western philosophy and in particular its Hegelian heritage. By introducing Rorty into the debate, a pledge is made for a new democratic culture of love and nonviolence as a `spiritual' mode of democratic experimentalism needed in our times. Finally, I show that Irigaray's and Rorty's thought share an affinity toward intercultural thinking, bearing important consequences for an ethicospiritual project of democratic experimentalism. 1. One of the foremost tasks of our age, according to Fred Dallmayr, is to reconnect ethics with politics. This can mean, firstly, to push the liberal conception of politics towards the so-called

Journal

Contemporary PragmatismBrill

Published: Apr 21, 2012

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