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On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue

On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue Helen Beebee, University of Birmingham The articles in this volume all concern, in one way or another, Hume’s epistemol- ogy and metaphysics. There are discussions of our knowledge of causal powers, the extent to which conceivability is a guide to modality, and testimony; there are also discussions of our ideas of space and time, the role in Hume’s thought of the psychological mechanism of ‘completing the union’, the role of impressions, and Hume’s argument against the claim that our perceptions are ‘locally conjoined’ with any entity (namely, a soul). The term ‘metaphysics’ – and to some extent also ‘epistemology’ – needs to be taken with a large pinch of salt, however, in this context. While Hume is often credited with distinctive metaphysical views (phenomenalism, for example, or the view that there is no such thing as causal necessity or the soul), many interpreters now take his project to be antithetical to, or at least largely tangen- tial to, metaphysics. On this view his main focus is on finding out how, as a matter of psychological fact, we acquire the beliefs we do (about the nature of reality, personal identity across http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis Brill

On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue

History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis , Volume 13 (1): 7 – Apr 5, 2010

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2666-4283
eISSN
2666-4275
DOI
10.30965/26664275-01301001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

On David Hume: A Preface to the Special Issue Helen Beebee, University of Birmingham The articles in this volume all concern, in one way or another, Hume’s epistemol- ogy and metaphysics. There are discussions of our knowledge of causal powers, the extent to which conceivability is a guide to modality, and testimony; there are also discussions of our ideas of space and time, the role in Hume’s thought of the psychological mechanism of ‘completing the union’, the role of impressions, and Hume’s argument against the claim that our perceptions are ‘locally conjoined’ with any entity (namely, a soul). The term ‘metaphysics’ – and to some extent also ‘epistemology’ – needs to be taken with a large pinch of salt, however, in this context. While Hume is often credited with distinctive metaphysical views (phenomenalism, for example, or the view that there is no such thing as causal necessity or the soul), many interpreters now take his project to be antithetical to, or at least largely tangen- tial to, metaphysics. On this view his main focus is on finding out how, as a matter of psychological fact, we acquire the beliefs we do (about the nature of reality, personal identity across

Journal

History of Philosophy and Logical AnalysisBrill

Published: Apr 5, 2010

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