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On Blank Pages, Storms, and Other Images of History

On Blank Pages, Storms, and Other Images of History 13 On Blank Pages, Storms, and Other Images of History DENNIS J. SCHMIDT Villanova University We speak of our hearts, our plans, as if they were our own, and yet there is a power outside of us that tosses us about as it pleases until it lays us in the grave, and of this power we know nothing, neither where it came from nor where it is going. - Hölderlin, Hyperion1 "History" is one of the names whereby we refer to that which is larger than that which we define or can know, but which nonetheless defines each of us. It is what exceeds me and my times; yet as defining the context and possibilities that circumscribe what can emerge from out of my times, it summons me to the infinite task of understanding what history itself might be said to be. Precisely this infinite task constitutes the finitude of human life. To take up the question of history is not only to ask about the context within which any time may be understood, it is equally-perhaps even most of all-to address this finitude. But what is perhaps most striking to one who would ask about how history http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

On Blank Pages, Storms, and Other Images of History

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 29 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 1999

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1999 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916499X00028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

13 On Blank Pages, Storms, and Other Images of History DENNIS J. SCHMIDT Villanova University We speak of our hearts, our plans, as if they were our own, and yet there is a power outside of us that tosses us about as it pleases until it lays us in the grave, and of this power we know nothing, neither where it came from nor where it is going. - Hölderlin, Hyperion1 "History" is one of the names whereby we refer to that which is larger than that which we define or can know, but which nonetheless defines each of us. It is what exceeds me and my times; yet as defining the context and possibilities that circumscribe what can emerge from out of my times, it summons me to the infinite task of understanding what history itself might be said to be. Precisely this infinite task constitutes the finitude of human life. To take up the question of history is not only to ask about the context within which any time may be understood, it is equally-perhaps even most of all-to address this finitude. But what is perhaps most striking to one who would ask about how history

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1999

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