Ocean Fertilisation and Climate Change: The Need to Regulate Emerging High Seas Uses

Ocean Fertilisation and Climate Change: The Need to Regulate Emerging High Seas Uses © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/092735208X295846 Th e International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law 23 (2008) 297–326 www.brill.nl/estu THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MARINE AND COASTAL LAW Ocean Fertilisation and Climate Change: Th e Need to Regulate Emerging High Seas Uses Rosemary Rayfuse Professor of International Law, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Mark G. Lawrence Modelling Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Kristina M. Gjerde High Seas Policy Advisor, Global Marine Program, IUCN Abstract Geo-engineering and environmental modification techniques are increasingly being proposed as climate change mitigation strategies. Ocean fertilisation has been promoted as a simple solution to the problem of increasing atmospheric CO 2 levels. However, neither its environ- mental safety nor its efficacy has been adequately assessed. Th is article examines the legality of ocean fertilisation under the law of the sea and concludes that it is subject to regulation under the London Convention and London Protocol as its potential for harm is contrary to the aims of these agreements. Hence, the sale of carbon offsets to fund ocean fertilisation activities should be prohibited unless and until an adequate risk assessment based http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law Brill

Ocean Fertilisation and Climate Change: The Need to Regulate Emerging High Seas Uses

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2008 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0927-3522
eISSN
1571-8085
D.O.I.
10.1163/092735208X295846
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2008 DOI: 10.1163/092735208X295846 Th e International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law 23 (2008) 297–326 www.brill.nl/estu THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MARINE AND COASTAL LAW Ocean Fertilisation and Climate Change: Th e Need to Regulate Emerging High Seas Uses Rosemary Rayfuse Professor of International Law, Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Mark G. Lawrence Modelling Group Leader, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Department of Atmospheric Chemistry, Mainz, Germany Kristina M. Gjerde High Seas Policy Advisor, Global Marine Program, IUCN Abstract Geo-engineering and environmental modification techniques are increasingly being proposed as climate change mitigation strategies. Ocean fertilisation has been promoted as a simple solution to the problem of increasing atmospheric CO 2 levels. However, neither its environ- mental safety nor its efficacy has been adequately assessed. Th is article examines the legality of ocean fertilisation under the law of the sea and concludes that it is subject to regulation under the London Convention and London Protocol as its potential for harm is contrary to the aims of these agreements. Hence, the sale of carbon offsets to fund ocean fertilisation activities should be prohibited unless and until an adequate risk assessment based

Journal

The International Journal of Marine and Coastal LawBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2008

Keywords: DUMPING; LONDON PROTOCOL; OCEAN FERTILISATION; LONDON CONVENTION

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