Notiunculae Martyrologicae III

Notiunculae Martyrologicae III NOTIUNCULAE MARTYROLOGICAE III SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE MARTYRIA OF POLYCARP AND PIONIUS BY JAN DEN BOEFT AND JAN BREMMER We continue our series of notes on some of the Acta Martyrum with observations on two Smyrnean martyria, viz. of Polycarp and Pionius.' I Again we follow the order of Musurillo's edition. Martyrium Polycarpi 11-12. In these paragraphs the proconsul con- tinues his interrogation of Polycarp. Having first appealed to the bishop's old age, he now proceeds to the use of more threatening language: "I have wild animals, and I shall expose you to them if you do not change your mind" (c. 11.1, tr. Musurillo). However, after the herald had announced Polycarp's confession, the mob did not ask the proconsul for his animals, but they shouted and asked the Asiarch Philip to set loose a lion on Polycarp. Why did they not request the proconsul to do so? The mob knew, of course-and Polycarp himself must also have known this-that Roman governors did not travel around with a small zoo. For the execution of criminals they were always dependent on the cities in which they temporarily resided to put on wild beast shows. There is a nice parallel http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vigiliae Christianae Brill

Notiunculae Martyrologicae III

Vigiliae Christianae, Volume 39 (2): 110 – Jan 1, 1985

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/notiunculae-martyrologicae-iii-0Pc0BeQLbx
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0042-6032
eISSN
1570-0720
D.O.I.
10.1163/157007285X00221
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NOTIUNCULAE MARTYROLOGICAE III SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE MARTYRIA OF POLYCARP AND PIONIUS BY JAN DEN BOEFT AND JAN BREMMER We continue our series of notes on some of the Acta Martyrum with observations on two Smyrnean martyria, viz. of Polycarp and Pionius.' I Again we follow the order of Musurillo's edition. Martyrium Polycarpi 11-12. In these paragraphs the proconsul con- tinues his interrogation of Polycarp. Having first appealed to the bishop's old age, he now proceeds to the use of more threatening language: "I have wild animals, and I shall expose you to them if you do not change your mind" (c. 11.1, tr. Musurillo). However, after the herald had announced Polycarp's confession, the mob did not ask the proconsul for his animals, but they shouted and asked the Asiarch Philip to set loose a lion on Polycarp. Why did they not request the proconsul to do so? The mob knew, of course-and Polycarp himself must also have known this-that Roman governors did not travel around with a small zoo. For the execution of criminals they were always dependent on the cities in which they temporarily resided to put on wild beast shows. There is a nice parallel

Journal

Vigiliae ChristianaeBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off