Notes On Eunapius

Notes On Eunapius 426 was called Pytho before any Apolline association: hence the aetiology to link the place-name to Apollo. 6) Cf. G. E. Dimock, The Name of Odysseus in Steiner & Fagles (above, n. 3), 106-121 (originally in The Hudson Review 9.1 [Spring 1956], 52-70). See further L. Ph. Rank, Etymologiseering en verwante verschijnselen bij Homerus (Assen 1951), esp. 52 ff. 7) I should like to thank my colleague W. R. Schoedel for his helpful suggestions on this note. MISCELLANEA NOTES ON EUNAPIUS 1) "Stilo et oratione utitur (ut omnes fatentur) affectata, inepta, putida, et (quod pessimum est) obscura et caliginosa". Thus Cobet 2), who devoted more time to Eunapius than most. I suspect his verdict is congenial to those who have had much to do with the Vitae Sophistayum. However, there are lexical gleanings to be had. Photius 3) condemned Eunapius' mania for adjectives ending in Two of the examples cited do not occur in the extant writings of Eunapius; they will have been in lost parts of his historical work. One of these two examples is It is used of tears. LS] cite only this reference. The other epithet is This one is not in LS] at all. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mnemosyne Brill

Notes On Eunapius

Mnemosyne, Volume 30 (4): 426 – Jan 1, 1977

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1977 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0026-7074
eISSN
1568-525X
D.O.I.
10.1163/156852577X00969
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

426 was called Pytho before any Apolline association: hence the aetiology to link the place-name to Apollo. 6) Cf. G. E. Dimock, The Name of Odysseus in Steiner & Fagles (above, n. 3), 106-121 (originally in The Hudson Review 9.1 [Spring 1956], 52-70). See further L. Ph. Rank, Etymologiseering en verwante verschijnselen bij Homerus (Assen 1951), esp. 52 ff. 7) I should like to thank my colleague W. R. Schoedel for his helpful suggestions on this note. MISCELLANEA NOTES ON EUNAPIUS 1) "Stilo et oratione utitur (ut omnes fatentur) affectata, inepta, putida, et (quod pessimum est) obscura et caliginosa". Thus Cobet 2), who devoted more time to Eunapius than most. I suspect his verdict is congenial to those who have had much to do with the Vitae Sophistayum. However, there are lexical gleanings to be had. Photius 3) condemned Eunapius' mania for adjectives ending in Two of the examples cited do not occur in the extant writings of Eunapius; they will have been in lost parts of his historical work. One of these two examples is It is used of tears. LS] cite only this reference. The other epithet is This one is not in LS] at all.

Journal

MnemosyneBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1977

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