Norma L. Rudinsky. Incipient Feminists: Women Writers in the Slovak National Revival. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publishers, Inc., 1991. 278 pp. $22.95.

Norma L. Rudinsky. Incipient Feminists: Women Writers in the Slovak National Revival. Columbus,... Bogert's masterful translations of quotations from Krlefa and cited critics make the book even more useful as a tool. The excellent bibliography, however, would be more helpful if it were to include a listing of the existing English translations of Krle2a's writing. Ellen Elias-Bursac Cambridge, Mass. N o r m a L. Rudinsky. Incipient F e m i n i s t s : Women Writers in the Slovak N a t i o n a l Revival. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publishers, Inc., 1991. 278 pp. $22.95. Though not formally trained as a scholar in Slavic studies, Norma L. Rudinsky is one of the top American specialists in Slovak literature. After publishing translations of major Slovak writers, Rudinsky plunged into the present work which was to stand originally as an introduction to her translations from Timrava (1867-1951), an important Slovak woman writer. The result is a study whose attractiveness lies in Rudinsky's application of American feminist Criticism's rhetoric and analyses to mostly nineteenth-century Slovak women writers such as Timrava, Soltesova, Podjavorinska and others. ' Needless to say, although not forgotten, these women writers are far from popular reading today. It takes an enthusiastic foreigner to rediscover for the English-speaking Slovaks their heritage. I for one would welcome a Slovak translation of this work. It would certainly help to start a new discussion of these worthy writers w h o - in the present climate of discovering the rest of the world - m i g h t remind Slovaks of some values situated closer to home and in the not too distant,past. Rudinsky chose to approach her material in a chronological order, but in broad groupings ("Woman as Inspiration," "Women as Help," "Women as "Women"), necessitating some cross referencing and jumps in chronology. I would prefer separate chapters for the main writers, but Rudinsky is justified by her well supported claim to introduce the "incipient feminists." An additional bonus is the Appendix of Slovak Women Poets 1798-1875 compiled by Marianna Pridavkova Minarikova. Here, some might quibble, if only because the examples of poetry generously offered here are in Slovak without the English translation and thus only of advantage to those specialists - presumably in Slovakia - who lacked this type of compendium. Rudinsky should be encouraged to continue in her exploration of contempo- rary women writers, particularly now when they appear with great frequency and with an astonishing display of talent: provoking, challenging, and inspiring. P e t e r Petro University of British Columbia http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Canadian-American Slavic Studies Brill

Norma L. Rudinsky. Incipient Feminists: Women Writers in the Slovak National Revival. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publishers, Inc., 1991. 278 pp. $22.95.

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Publisher
BRILL
Copyright
© 1994 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0090-8290
eISSN
2210-2396
D.O.I.
10.1163/221023994X00567
Publisher site
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Abstract

Bogert's masterful translations of quotations from Krlefa and cited critics make the book even more useful as a tool. The excellent bibliography, however, would be more helpful if it were to include a listing of the existing English translations of Krle2a's writing. Ellen Elias-Bursac Cambridge, Mass. N o r m a L. Rudinsky. Incipient F e m i n i s t s : Women Writers in the Slovak N a t i o n a l Revival. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publishers, Inc., 1991. 278 pp. $22.95. Though not formally trained as a scholar in Slavic studies, Norma L. Rudinsky is one of the top American specialists in Slovak literature. After publishing translations of major Slovak writers, Rudinsky plunged into the present work which was to stand originally as an introduction to her translations from Timrava (1867-1951), an important Slovak woman writer. The result is a study whose attractiveness lies in Rudinsky's application of American feminist Criticism's rhetoric and analyses to mostly nineteenth-century Slovak women writers such as Timrava, Soltesova, Podjavorinska and others. ' Needless to say, although not forgotten, these women writers are far from popular reading today. It takes an enthusiastic foreigner to rediscover for the English-speaking Slovaks their heritage. I for one would welcome a Slovak translation of this work. It would certainly help to start a new discussion of these worthy writers w h o - in the present climate of discovering the rest of the world - m i g h t remind Slovaks of some values situated closer to home and in the not too distant,past. Rudinsky chose to approach her material in a chronological order, but in broad groupings ("Woman as Inspiration," "Women as Help," "Women as "Women"), necessitating some cross referencing and jumps in chronology. I would prefer separate chapters for the main writers, but Rudinsky is justified by her well supported claim to introduce the "incipient feminists." An additional bonus is the Appendix of Slovak Women Poets 1798-1875 compiled by Marianna Pridavkova Minarikova. Here, some might quibble, if only because the examples of poetry generously offered here are in Slovak without the English translation and thus only of advantage to those specialists - presumably in Slovakia - who lacked this type of compendium. Rudinsky should be encouraged to continue in her exploration of contempo- rary women writers, particularly now when they appear with great frequency and with an astonishing display of talent: provoking, challenging, and inspiring. P e t e r Petro University of British Columbia

Journal

Canadian-American Slavic StudiesBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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