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Nihilism and the End of Philosophy

Nihilism and the End of Philosophy 79 Nihilism and the End of Philosophy JOAN STAMBAUGH Hunter College The title of one of Heidegger's later essays reads: The End of Philos- ophy and the Task of Thinking. The phrase, "the end of philosophy" takes on increasing importance in the later writings so that the thoughtful reader begins to ask himself what Heidegger really means by that phrase. Does he mean that philosophy is "over," finished, done with? Is he making a statement similar to that of Hegel who says (in the Lectures on aesthetics) that the time for art to express the highest reality, absolute Spirit, is past, that art is no longer capable of adequately expressing absolute Spirit and is thus, essentially, a thing of the past? In contrast to Schelling who thought that art was the highest expression of all since it synthesized both nature and Spirit, Hegel meant by his statement that art is a thing of the past, that absolute Spirit had developed beyond the level of any kind of sensuousness to the pure concept; since art always nec- essarily involves some element of sensuousness, it was no longer capable of expressing absolute Spirit at its developmental stage of the pure http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Nihilism and the End of Philosophy

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 15 (1): 79 – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1985 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916485X00050
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

79 Nihilism and the End of Philosophy JOAN STAMBAUGH Hunter College The title of one of Heidegger's later essays reads: The End of Philos- ophy and the Task of Thinking. The phrase, "the end of philosophy" takes on increasing importance in the later writings so that the thoughtful reader begins to ask himself what Heidegger really means by that phrase. Does he mean that philosophy is "over," finished, done with? Is he making a statement similar to that of Hegel who says (in the Lectures on aesthetics) that the time for art to express the highest reality, absolute Spirit, is past, that art is no longer capable of adequately expressing absolute Spirit and is thus, essentially, a thing of the past? In contrast to Schelling who thought that art was the highest expression of all since it synthesized both nature and Spirit, Hegel meant by his statement that art is a thing of the past, that absolute Spirit had developed beyond the level of any kind of sensuousness to the pure concept; since art always nec- essarily involves some element of sensuousness, it was no longer capable of expressing absolute Spirit at its developmental stage of the pure

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1985

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