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Newspaper Reporting of Migrants in England 1851–1911: Spatial and Temporal Perspectives

Newspaper Reporting of Migrants in England 1851–1911: Spatial and Temporal Perspectives England in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was no stranger to migrants and, inevitably, migrants were not always warmly received. They were often stigmatised for their perceived differences of language, religion and behaviour, and were blamed for a range of social ills including crime and low wages. In this article I examine print news reporting in six English port cities from c1850 to 1911. I focus on the ways in which crime reporting in particular characterised both offenders and victims, and the extent to which migrant origin was considered a relevant characteristic to report. It is argued that for the most part migrant origin was not widely mentioned in crime reports in regional newspapers, though there were periods when migrant origin was increasingly foregrounded and these coincided with times when migration to England was becoming increasingly politicised, especially before and immediately after the passing of the Aliens Act in 1905. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Migration History Brill

Newspaper Reporting of Migrants in England 1851–1911: Spatial and Temporal Perspectives

Journal of Migration History , Volume 5 (1): 22 – Apr 25, 2019

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
2351-9916
eISSN
2351-9924
DOI
10.1163/23519924-00501003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

England in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was no stranger to migrants and, inevitably, migrants were not always warmly received. They were often stigmatised for their perceived differences of language, religion and behaviour, and were blamed for a range of social ills including crime and low wages. In this article I examine print news reporting in six English port cities from c1850 to 1911. I focus on the ways in which crime reporting in particular characterised both offenders and victims, and the extent to which migrant origin was considered a relevant characteristic to report. It is argued that for the most part migrant origin was not widely mentioned in crime reports in regional newspapers, though there were periods when migrant origin was increasingly foregrounded and these coincided with times when migration to England was becoming increasingly politicised, especially before and immediately after the passing of the Aliens Act in 1905.

Journal

Journal of Migration HistoryBrill

Published: Apr 25, 2019

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