New Zealand

New Zealand The Application of the Precautionary and Adaptive Management Approaches in the Seabed Mining Context: Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd Marine Consent Decision under New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012IntroductionThis note analyses a recent path-breaking decision by the Decision-making Committee (dmc) of the Environmental Protection Authority (epa) of New Zealand. In the Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd Marine Consent Decision (June 2014),1 the dmc considered the country’s first application for ‘marine consent’ for continental shelf seabed mining under the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (eez Act).2 The eez Act came into force on 28 June 2013 and set up a legislative framework to regulate and manage the environmental effects of activities in the exclusive economic zone and on the continental shelf, which were not previously managed.In the instant case, the dmc refused to grant a marine consent because it decided that the consent application was ‘premature’.3 The decision has attracted considerable attention4 as it comes against the backdrop of the worldwide resurgence of interest in deep seabed mining.5 Of the 4,702 public submissions made to the epa in respect of the Trans-Tasman Resources application, 4,680 opposed the application.6 For those against the idea http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law Brill

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/new-zealand-do1U90dgcG
Publisher
Brill | Nijhoff
Copyright
Copyright © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Current Legal Developments New Zealand
ISSN
0927-3522
eISSN
1571-8085
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718085-12341343
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Application of the Precautionary and Adaptive Management Approaches in the Seabed Mining Context: Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd Marine Consent Decision under New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012IntroductionThis note analyses a recent path-breaking decision by the Decision-making Committee (dmc) of the Environmental Protection Authority (epa) of New Zealand. In the Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd Marine Consent Decision (June 2014),1 the dmc considered the country’s first application for ‘marine consent’ for continental shelf seabed mining under the Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) Act 2012 (eez Act).2 The eez Act came into force on 28 June 2013 and set up a legislative framework to regulate and manage the environmental effects of activities in the exclusive economic zone and on the continental shelf, which were not previously managed.In the instant case, the dmc refused to grant a marine consent because it decided that the consent application was ‘premature’.3 The decision has attracted considerable attention4 as it comes against the backdrop of the worldwide resurgence of interest in deep seabed mining.5 Of the 4,702 public submissions made to the epa in respect of the Trans-Tasman Resources application, 4,680 opposed the application.6 For those against the idea

Journal

The International Journal of Marine and Coastal LawBrill

Published: Feb 19, 2015

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off