Neurophenomenology of the Supernatural Sense in Religion

Neurophenomenology of the Supernatural Sense in Religion NEUROPHENOMENOLOGY OF THE SUPERNATURAL SENSE IN RELIGION F  H. P  The great majority of scholarly de fi nitions of “religion” center around some notion involving experience or awareness of a supernatural dimension ( forces, entities). This sense of the supernatural has been found in virtually all human societies extending back into paleolithic times. Advances in neuroscienti fi c research technology have made it possible to assert that phenomenal experience is in fact a form of brain activity; the two are identical. This naturally leads us to inquire as to why and how a brain evolving to serve the needs of survival and replication in a harsh natural envi- ronment should have developed the capacity and evident propensity to generate a sense of the supernatural. Psychology has recently identi fi ed a set of three primitive interpretive modules dedicated to generating a sense of causative essence. These mo- dules are located in areas of the brain whose representational output can be experi- enced as non-material, like the stream of thought, rather than as external physical landscape. These non-physical neurophenomenal essences are identical to the three forms of otherworldly spirit essence found throughout human religious history, and they http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Method & Theory in the Study of Religion Brill

Neurophenomenology of the Supernatural Sense in Religion

Method & Theory in the Study of Religion, Volume 16 (2): 122 – Jan 1, 2004

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/neurophenomenology-of-the-supernatural-sense-in-religion-W7RYBRBuhj
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2004 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0943-3058
eISSN
1570-0682
D.O.I.
10.1163/1570068042360242
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

NEUROPHENOMENOLOGY OF THE SUPERNATURAL SENSE IN RELIGION F  H. P  The great majority of scholarly de fi nitions of “religion” center around some notion involving experience or awareness of a supernatural dimension ( forces, entities). This sense of the supernatural has been found in virtually all human societies extending back into paleolithic times. Advances in neuroscienti fi c research technology have made it possible to assert that phenomenal experience is in fact a form of brain activity; the two are identical. This naturally leads us to inquire as to why and how a brain evolving to serve the needs of survival and replication in a harsh natural envi- ronment should have developed the capacity and evident propensity to generate a sense of the supernatural. Psychology has recently identi fi ed a set of three primitive interpretive modules dedicated to generating a sense of causative essence. These mo- dules are located in areas of the brain whose representational output can be experi- enced as non-material, like the stream of thought, rather than as external physical landscape. These non-physical neurophenomenal essences are identical to the three forms of otherworldly spirit essence found throughout human religious history, and they

Journal

Method & Theory in the Study of ReligionBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2004

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off