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Neighbors in Death1

Neighbors in Death1 208 Neighbors in Death1 STEVEN GALT CROWELL Rice University Werner Marx's teaching career spanned two continents and two cul- tures ; his German Jewish experience spanned the divide between two irreconcilable historical worlds; and his academic mission combined the roles of thinker and witness. It is not surprising, then, that his philosophizing is characterized throughout by a certain set of doublings. There is, first, a deep appreciation for the inescapability of Heidegger's challenge to thought, combined with an equally deep suspicion of Heidegger's apparent blind spots. Marx's early book, Heidegger and the Tradition, set the agenda by refusing to think truth as infected by "untruth"; thereafter his calling-and his call to us-would be to think with Heidegger beyond (or even against) Heidegger in order that post- metaphysical thinking might find purchase in domains, such as ethics, where Heidegger was either unwilling (or perhaps unable) to extend it.2 A second doubling, or doubling back, facilitated this extension. Werner Marx never forgot that the Lehrstuhl of the Philosophisches Semi- nar I was not the Heidegger Chair alone, but equally the Husserl-Rickert- Riehl Chair; Marx's postwar thought could thus retrieve the impulses of German Idealism preserved in the neo-Kantian tradition, together http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research in Phenomenology Brill

Neighbors in Death1

Research in Phenomenology , Volume 27 (1): 208 – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1997 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0085-5553
eISSN
1569-1640
DOI
10.1163/156916497X00110
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

208 Neighbors in Death1 STEVEN GALT CROWELL Rice University Werner Marx's teaching career spanned two continents and two cul- tures ; his German Jewish experience spanned the divide between two irreconcilable historical worlds; and his academic mission combined the roles of thinker and witness. It is not surprising, then, that his philosophizing is characterized throughout by a certain set of doublings. There is, first, a deep appreciation for the inescapability of Heidegger's challenge to thought, combined with an equally deep suspicion of Heidegger's apparent blind spots. Marx's early book, Heidegger and the Tradition, set the agenda by refusing to think truth as infected by "untruth"; thereafter his calling-and his call to us-would be to think with Heidegger beyond (or even against) Heidegger in order that post- metaphysical thinking might find purchase in domains, such as ethics, where Heidegger was either unwilling (or perhaps unable) to extend it.2 A second doubling, or doubling back, facilitated this extension. Werner Marx never forgot that the Lehrstuhl of the Philosophisches Semi- nar I was not the Heidegger Chair alone, but equally the Husserl-Rickert- Riehl Chair; Marx's postwar thought could thus retrieve the impulses of German Idealism preserved in the neo-Kantian tradition, together

Journal

Research in PhenomenologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1997

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