Negotiating Internal Conflict: Incentives and Intractability

Negotiating Internal Conflict: Incentives and Intractability International Negotiation 6: 297–302, 2001. © 2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 297 Negotiating Internal Conflict: Incentives and Intractability I. WILLIAM ZARTMAN ∗ Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University 1740 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington DC 20036 USA (E-mail: zartman@sais-jhu.edu) Internal wars occupy the largest sub-category of intractable conflicts (the other large sub-category being enduring rivalries between pairs of states). Among these long-lasting civil wars, South Africa (1952–1990), Mozam- bique (1974–1992), Mali (1962–1994), and Tajikistan (1991–1997) provide cases of intractable conflicts that were apparently resolved, whereas Cyprus (since 1955), Colombia (since 1964), and Sri Lanka (since 1983) furnish prominent examples of repeated attempts and failures at conflict manage- ment. Notably, Cyprus and Sri Lanka entered into new rounds of negotiations in 2002, just as Colombia appeared to be leaving its latest round empty- handed. Comparisons between the two sets of cases can provide useful insights into the conditions for dealing with intractability, and possibly even timely commentaries on the chances of the ongoing negotiations. The concept of incentives provides an important lever for opening the door to solutions. Many types of analysis begin with the simple observation that parties do not change http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Negotiation Brill

Negotiating Internal Conflict: Incentives and Intractability

International Negotiation, Volume 6 (3): 297 – Jan 1, 2001

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2001 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1382-340X
eISSN
1571-8069
D.O.I.
10.1163/15718060120849125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

International Negotiation 6: 297–302, 2001. © 2002 Kluwer Law International. Printed in the Netherlands. 297 Negotiating Internal Conflict: Incentives and Intractability I. WILLIAM ZARTMAN ∗ Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, The Johns Hopkins University 1740 Massachusetts Avenue, Washington DC 20036 USA (E-mail: zartman@sais-jhu.edu) Internal wars occupy the largest sub-category of intractable conflicts (the other large sub-category being enduring rivalries between pairs of states). Among these long-lasting civil wars, South Africa (1952–1990), Mozam- bique (1974–1992), Mali (1962–1994), and Tajikistan (1991–1997) provide cases of intractable conflicts that were apparently resolved, whereas Cyprus (since 1955), Colombia (since 1964), and Sri Lanka (since 1983) furnish prominent examples of repeated attempts and failures at conflict manage- ment. Notably, Cyprus and Sri Lanka entered into new rounds of negotiations in 2002, just as Colombia appeared to be leaving its latest round empty- handed. Comparisons between the two sets of cases can provide useful insights into the conditions for dealing with intractability, and possibly even timely commentaries on the chances of the ongoing negotiations. The concept of incentives provides an important lever for opening the door to solutions. Many types of analysis begin with the simple observation that parties do not change

Journal

International NegotiationBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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