Mutual Mother-Pup Recognition in Galápagos Fur Seals and Sea Lions: Cues Used and Functional Significance

Mutual Mother-Pup Recognition in Galápagos Fur Seals and Sea Lions: Cues Used and Functional... MUTUAL MOTHER-PUP RECOGNITION IN GALÁPAGOS FUR SEALS AND SEA LIONS: CUES USED AND FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE by FRITZ TRILLMICH1) (Max-Planck-Institut für Verhaltensphysiologie, Seewiesen, W.-Germany) (With 10 Figures) (Acc. 8-IV-1981 ) Mothers of colonially breeding seals regularly reunite promptly with their own pups after sometimes long absence at sea. This performance is astonishing as especially older otariid young move over considerable distances within the colony during the absence of their mothers and often gather in pods of about equal age. Individual recognition seems the only plausible hypothesis explaining the necessary discriminatory perfor- mance. Although experimental evidence on individual recognition in seals is almost nonexistant (except in the elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris, PETRINOVICH, 1974), most authors agree that mothers take far the more active part in recognition, and that young pups react in- discriminately to any female approaching with a Pup Attraction Call (PAC) (BARTHOLOMEW, 1959; FOGDEN, 1971; LAWS, 1956; PETERSON & BARTHOLOMEW, 1967 (for pups less than two months of age), PETRINOVICH, 1974; McNAB & CRAWLEY, 1975). Other authors (RAND, 1967; SANDEGREN, 1970; PETERSON & BARTHOLOMEW, 1967 (for pups older than two months)) assume that pups too contribute specifically towards a reunion. The latter appears far more plausible as pups http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Behaviour Brill

Mutual Mother-Pup Recognition in Galápagos Fur Seals and Sea Lions: Cues Used and Functional Significance

Behaviour, Volume 78 (1-2): 21 – Jan 1, 1981

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/mutual-mother-pup-recognition-in-gal-pagos-fur-seals-and-sea-lions-N2uPY5uIkw
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 1981 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
0005-7959
eISSN
1568-539X
DOI
10.1163/156853981X00248
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

MUTUAL MOTHER-PUP RECOGNITION IN GALÁPAGOS FUR SEALS AND SEA LIONS: CUES USED AND FUNCTIONAL SIGNIFICANCE by FRITZ TRILLMICH1) (Max-Planck-Institut für Verhaltensphysiologie, Seewiesen, W.-Germany) (With 10 Figures) (Acc. 8-IV-1981 ) Mothers of colonially breeding seals regularly reunite promptly with their own pups after sometimes long absence at sea. This performance is astonishing as especially older otariid young move over considerable distances within the colony during the absence of their mothers and often gather in pods of about equal age. Individual recognition seems the only plausible hypothesis explaining the necessary discriminatory perfor- mance. Although experimental evidence on individual recognition in seals is almost nonexistant (except in the elephant seal, Mirounga angustirostris, PETRINOVICH, 1974), most authors agree that mothers take far the more active part in recognition, and that young pups react in- discriminately to any female approaching with a Pup Attraction Call (PAC) (BARTHOLOMEW, 1959; FOGDEN, 1971; LAWS, 1956; PETERSON & BARTHOLOMEW, 1967 (for pups less than two months of age), PETRINOVICH, 1974; McNAB & CRAWLEY, 1975). Other authors (RAND, 1967; SANDEGREN, 1970; PETERSON & BARTHOLOMEW, 1967 (for pups older than two months)) assume that pups too contribute specifically towards a reunion. The latter appears far more plausible as pups

Journal

BehaviourBrill

Published: Jan 1, 1981

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off