Motor unit recruitment during vertebrate locomotion

Motor unit recruitment during vertebrate locomotion Animal Biology , Vol. 55, No. 1, pp. 41-58 (2005)  Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005. Also available online - www.brill.nl Motor unit recruitment during vertebrate locomotion Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK Abstract —Vertebrate skeletal muscles act across joints and produce segmental accelerations and therefore animal movement when they contract. Different muscles and different motor units vary in their mechanical contractile properties. Early studies on motor unit recruitment demonstrated orderly recruitment of motor units from the slowest to the fastest during a graded contraction. However, many subsequent studies illustrate conditions when alternative recruitment strategies may exist. Motor unit recruitment during locomotion is thus multifactorial and more complex than typically thought. Different types of motor unit vary in their mechanical properties, including rates of force activation and deactivation, maximum unloaded shortening velocities and the shortening velocities at which maximum mechanical power output and maximum mechanical efficiency occur. In short, it would make mechanical sense to perform fast activities with the faster motor units and slow activities with the slower motor units. However, determining patterns of motor unit recruitment during locomotion has presented experimental challenges. Comparisons between distinct muscles have shown that fast http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Biology Brill

Motor unit recruitment during vertebrate locomotion

Animal Biology, Volume 55 (1): 41 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2005 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1570-7555
eISSN
1570-7563
DOI
10.1163/1570756053276880
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Animal Biology , Vol. 55, No. 1, pp. 41-58 (2005)  Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2005. Also available online - www.brill.nl Motor unit recruitment during vertebrate locomotion Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Hertfordshire, AL9 7TA, UK Abstract —Vertebrate skeletal muscles act across joints and produce segmental accelerations and therefore animal movement when they contract. Different muscles and different motor units vary in their mechanical contractile properties. Early studies on motor unit recruitment demonstrated orderly recruitment of motor units from the slowest to the fastest during a graded contraction. However, many subsequent studies illustrate conditions when alternative recruitment strategies may exist. Motor unit recruitment during locomotion is thus multifactorial and more complex than typically thought. Different types of motor unit vary in their mechanical properties, including rates of force activation and deactivation, maximum unloaded shortening velocities and the shortening velocities at which maximum mechanical power output and maximum mechanical efficiency occur. In short, it would make mechanical sense to perform fast activities with the faster motor units and slow activities with the slower motor units. However, determining patterns of motor unit recruitment during locomotion has presented experimental challenges. Comparisons between distinct muscles have shown that fast

Journal

Animal BiologyBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2005

Keywords: LOCOMOTION; MOTOR UNIT; RECRUITMENT; MUSCLE

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