More Than a Furry Companion: The Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community

More Than a Furry Companion: The Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions... More Th an a Furry Companion: Th e Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community Lisa J. Wood, 1 Billie Giles-Corti, Max K. Bulsara, and Darcy A. Bosch Th e University of Western Australia Abstract Companion animals (pets) exemplify the affinities possible between humans and nonhuman ani- mals. Evidence documenting a diversity of emotional, physical, and therapeutic benefits of pet guardianship (ownership) substantiates sentimental anecdotes from pet owners. Although the lit- erature focuses primarily on the “one to one” benefits accruing from interactions with pets, this paper explores the potential role of pets as facilitators of social interactions and sense of community. Th e paper uses triangulation to synthesize findings from qualitative and quantitative research undertaken in three Western Australian suburbs. Th e qualitative data derive from 12 focus groups and quantitative data, from a survey of 339 residents. In both qualitative and quantitative research, pet ownership positively associated with social interactions, favor exchanges, civic engagement, per- ceptions of neighborhood friendliness, and sense of community. Pets appeared to ameliorate some determinants of mental health such as loneliness. Findings suggest pets have a ripple effect extend- ing beyond their guardians (owners) to non-pet owners http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Society & Animals Brill

More Than a Furry Companion: The Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community

Loading next page...
 
/lp/brill/more-than-a-furry-companion-the-ripple-effect-of-companion-animals-on-0XKUV9STGM
Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2007 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1063-1119
eISSN
1568-5306
DOI
10.1163/156853007X169333
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

More Th an a Furry Companion: Th e Ripple Effect of Companion Animals on Neighborhood Interactions and Sense of Community Lisa J. Wood, 1 Billie Giles-Corti, Max K. Bulsara, and Darcy A. Bosch Th e University of Western Australia Abstract Companion animals (pets) exemplify the affinities possible between humans and nonhuman ani- mals. Evidence documenting a diversity of emotional, physical, and therapeutic benefits of pet guardianship (ownership) substantiates sentimental anecdotes from pet owners. Although the lit- erature focuses primarily on the “one to one” benefits accruing from interactions with pets, this paper explores the potential role of pets as facilitators of social interactions and sense of community. Th e paper uses triangulation to synthesize findings from qualitative and quantitative research undertaken in three Western Australian suburbs. Th e qualitative data derive from 12 focus groups and quantitative data, from a survey of 339 residents. In both qualitative and quantitative research, pet ownership positively associated with social interactions, favor exchanges, civic engagement, per- ceptions of neighborhood friendliness, and sense of community. Pets appeared to ameliorate some determinants of mental health such as loneliness. Findings suggest pets have a ripple effect extend- ing beyond their guardians (owners) to non-pet owners

Journal

Society & AnimalsBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2007

Keywords: SENSE OF COMMUNITY; HEALTH; TRIANGULATION; SOCIAL INTERACTIONS; PETS; SOCIAL CAPITAL

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off