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Moral Perception , written by Robert Audi

Moral Perception , written by Robert Audi (Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2013), 180 pp. isbn 9780691156484 (hbk). $35.00. We may well talk about ‘seeing’ that some act is wrong, but it looks as though this is a metaphor. How seriously should we take this metaphor? Can we really get moral knowledge by (in some sense) seeing the rightness or wrongness of an act? Robert Audi thinks so, and in Moral Perception he explains why. For many years Audi has been a leading figure in moral epistemology, and this book provides the most recent statement of his views. Moral Perception is a short but wide-ranging book, offering an interesting account of how we can come to know moral facts by perceiving moral properties. The book is divided into two parts and seven chapters. The first part tackles perception generally and moral perception specifically, and argues that moral perception can yield moral knowledge. The second part discusses the way in which emotion and intuition relate to moral perception. I am yet to be convinced by the account of moral perception offered here, but it’s certainly interesting and worthy of attention. In Chapter 1 Audi outlines a general account of perception. Some key elements are as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Moral Philosophy Brill

Moral Perception , written by Robert Audi

Journal of Moral Philosophy , Volume 13 (3): 377 – May 13, 2016

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2016 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
Subject
Book Reviews
ISSN
1740-4681
eISSN
1745-5243
DOI
10.1163/17455243-01303002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

(Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 2013), 180 pp. isbn 9780691156484 (hbk). $35.00. We may well talk about ‘seeing’ that some act is wrong, but it looks as though this is a metaphor. How seriously should we take this metaphor? Can we really get moral knowledge by (in some sense) seeing the rightness or wrongness of an act? Robert Audi thinks so, and in Moral Perception he explains why. For many years Audi has been a leading figure in moral epistemology, and this book provides the most recent statement of his views. Moral Perception is a short but wide-ranging book, offering an interesting account of how we can come to know moral facts by perceiving moral properties. The book is divided into two parts and seven chapters. The first part tackles perception generally and moral perception specifically, and argues that moral perception can yield moral knowledge. The second part discusses the way in which emotion and intuition relate to moral perception. I am yet to be convinced by the account of moral perception offered here, but it’s certainly interesting and worthy of attention. In Chapter 1 Audi outlines a general account of perception. Some key elements are as

Journal

Journal of Moral PhilosophyBrill

Published: May 13, 2016

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