Moral Contagion Attitudes towards Potential Organ Transplants in British and Japanese Adults

Moral Contagion Attitudes towards Potential Organ Transplants in British and Japanese Adults © Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156853711X591251 Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (2011) 269–286 brill.nl/jocc Moral Contagion Attitudes towards Potential Organ Transplants in British and Japanese Adults Bruce M. Hood a, * , Nathalia L. Gjersoe a , Katherine Donnelly a , Alison Byers a and Shoji Itajkura b a Bristol Cognitive Development Centre, University of Bristol, 12a Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1TN, UK b School of Graduate Letters, Kyoto University, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 6060-8501, Japan *Corresponding author, e-mail: bruce.hood@bristol.ac.uk Abstract In two studies we investigated whether people evidence an effect of moral contamination with respect to hypothetical organ transplants. This was achieved by asking participants to make judgements after presenting either positive or negative background information about the donor. In the first study, positive/negative background information had a corresponding effect on three judgements with attitudes to a heart transplant most pronounced by negative background information relative to good information and controls. This effect was replicated in the second study with both heart and liver transplantation. Negative effects were stronger than positive effects in all conditions consistent with a negativity bias, but again stronger with regards to organs than controls. These results confirm findings from http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cognition and Culture Brill

Moral Contagion Attitudes towards Potential Organ Transplants in British and Japanese Adults

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Publisher
Brill
Copyright
© 2011 Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The Netherlands
ISSN
1567-7095
eISSN
1568-5373
DOI
10.1163/156853711X591251
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

© Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, 2011 DOI: 10.1163/156853711X591251 Journal of Cognition and Culture 11 (2011) 269–286 brill.nl/jocc Moral Contagion Attitudes towards Potential Organ Transplants in British and Japanese Adults Bruce M. Hood a, * , Nathalia L. Gjersoe a , Katherine Donnelly a , Alison Byers a and Shoji Itajkura b a Bristol Cognitive Development Centre, University of Bristol, 12a Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1TN, UK b School of Graduate Letters, Kyoto University, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 6060-8501, Japan *Corresponding author, e-mail: bruce.hood@bristol.ac.uk Abstract In two studies we investigated whether people evidence an effect of moral contamination with respect to hypothetical organ transplants. This was achieved by asking participants to make judgements after presenting either positive or negative background information about the donor. In the first study, positive/negative background information had a corresponding effect on three judgements with attitudes to a heart transplant most pronounced by negative background information relative to good information and controls. This effect was replicated in the second study with both heart and liver transplantation. Negative effects were stronger than positive effects in all conditions consistent with a negativity bias, but again stronger with regards to organs than controls. These results confirm findings from

Journal

Journal of Cognition and CultureBrill

Published: Jan 1, 2011

Keywords: organ transplantation; Moral contagion; sympathetic magical thinking

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